NASPA Online Learning Community

PRACTICES Professional Development Series


The NASPA Advisory Services PRACTICES Professional Development Series offers nine 60-minute webinars focused on topics spanning across our signature framework, PRACTICES. The framework focuses on student affairs and services’ policies, resources, alignment and partnerships with academic affairs, compliance, technology, inclusion, community, evidence-based practices, and student success efforts. This webinar series is a flexible, effective way to provide a comprehensive professional development series to your staff and is available as a bundle or a la carte.


Available Offerings

Click on the webinars or bundle below to learn more about the program and how to register. If you register for the live webinar but are unable to attend, you will be able to access the recording for 365 days after the live webinar date.

  • Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/23/2024

    In the post-pandemic era, leaders in student affairs and across higher education have been challenged to recruit and retain professional staff while maintaining our efforts to support student success. This webinar will offer participants the opportunity to hear about how division leadership worked intentionally to change the culture in their division by offering opportunities for staff to engage in critical dialogue that is resulting in improved staff morale, greater trust and tangible change.

    Paz Maya Olivérez, Ph.D.

    Vice President, Student Affairs

    California State University, San Bernardino

    An accomplished administrator and educator, Dr. Olivérez brings a wealth of higher education and California State University (CSU) experience to her role as Vice President for Student Affairs at California State University, San Bernardino (CSUB). Prior to serving as the associate vice president and dean of students, she served as the interim vice president for student affairs at Stanislaus State. Before that, she spent eight years at California State University, Dominguez Hills, where she held several administrative positions including associate vice president for student success. 

    Dr. Olivérez’s leadership experience in higher education includes oversight of programs that support student development, student engagement, and student success. During her 20 years as an educator, Dr. Olivérez has served diverse student populations throughout California and received national recognition for her innovative efforts to help students build a strong foundation for long-term educational and professional success.

    Based on the book “Creating Sustainable Careers in Student Affairs: What Ideal Worker Norms Get Wrong & How to Make it Right” by Sallee, et al. (2020), this webinar will describe how leaders in one Division of Student Affairs worked with the book’s authors to intentionally develop and deliver a 2-year long series of in-person and virtual facilitated dialogues and workshops where staff were given the opportunity to engage with the book, its authors, and each other. These dialogues and workshops allowed participants to discuss the ways in which they internalized ideal worker norms throughout their professional lives, and how this shaped their behaviors as professionals, perceived expectations by their supervisors, consequent expectations of themselves, and the real-life costs of these behaviors and expectations. Honest and unfiltered conversations involving division staff and leaders about the impact of ideal workers norms on staff, their colleagues, and the students they serve revealed that these norms led to stress, burnout, fatigue, lack of work-life balance, disengagement, poor morale, and high turnover.

    While they allowed for division leaders and staff to speak openly about how they had been feeling over the last two years and throughout much of their careers in Student Affairs, these dialogues were also cathartic as they provided a rare space for members of the division to engage in small and large group dialogue about how they were experiencing their work prior to, during, and in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic. In fact, many participants expressed their appreciation to division leaders for being provided the space to discuss their experiences critically and for being given the opportunity to speak candidly about how they were feeling. However, others remained skeptical that these conversations would lead to actionable steps and tangible change that would impact their experience as workers in their respective division, on their respective campus, and/or in the field of student affairs or higher education.

    Participants in this session will have the opportunity to hear from the SSAO who worked with Dr. Sallee and her colleagues to initiate and deliver the book read and related dialogues and workshops. Those in attendance will also have the opportunity to share approaches to supporting the long-term sustainability of student affairs professionals utilized on their own campuses prior to, during, and in the aftermath of the pandemic and the degree to which these efforts impacted the culture of their divisions and their work on behalf of students. The presenter will also facilitate an interactive discussion of the challenges experienced by professionals and students in the room on their own respective campuses and how they might apply the approaches described in the session.

    Learning Outcomes: 

    1. Learn about the concept of ideal worker norms and how real & perceived manager expectations can exacerbate the fatigue, stress, and burnout often experienced by student affairs professionals responsible for supporting diverse students with complex and ever-changing needs;
    2. Learn how leaders in one Division of Student Affairs worked intentionally to change their division culture by offering opportunities for staff to engage in critical dialogue to dismantle ideal worker norms;
    3. Learn how honest dialogue involving Student Affairs leaders and staff at all levels can result in improved staff morale, greater trust and tangible change;
    4. Learn practical strategies for implementing actionable steps and tangible changes that can be made in any Division of Student Affairs to dismantle ideal worker norms and create more sustainable careers for student affairs professionals.

    Questions about the webinar? Email practices@naspa.org.

    NASPA has been approved by the Higher Education Consortium for Student Affairs Certification to provide CE credit for Certified Student Affairs Educators (CSAEd). NASPA is solely responsible for all aspects of this program.


    Guidelines for earning CE credit: 

    1 CE is awarded for attending this live session. 

    No partial credit will be rewarded. 

    Participants must also complete the feedback survey in the Online Learning Community.

    Credit is available for attending the live session and viewing the on-demand recording. 

    To receive CSAEd credit, attendees must complete the Feedback Survey in the online event offering the certification. Once the survey is completed, your Certificate will be available in the event modules. The Certificate of Completion, which will show the event and credit earnings, is available for download and/or print from the event in your Online Learning Community.

  • Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/06/2024

    Traditionally, student affairs has data dispersed across the division, which limits the use of data to inquiry about programs and services, inform improvement efforts and decision-making, and share impact stories. Come learn how your department or division can approach building a data lake to create real-time data visualizations that support inquiry, improvement, and impact.

    Heather J. Strine-Patterson, Ph.D.

    Director of Student Affairs Assessment

    Appalachian State University

    Dr. Heather Strine-Patterson is the Director of Student Affairs Assessment at Appalachian State University. She also serves as the current Editor for the Journal of Student Affairs Inquiry, Improvement, and Impact and an Ex Officio Board Member with Student Affairs Assessment Leaders (SAAL). Dr. Strine-Patterson has done numerous presentations at regional and national conferences and recently published "Assessment is a leadership process: The Multilevel assessment process" with New Directions for Student Services.

    Nearly 20 years ago, Dr. Strine-Patterson began her career as a student affairs practitioner. Five years ago, she began her full-time professional journey with student affairs assessment at Appalachian State. There, among other things, she is currently leading efforts to build a student affairs data lake that informs the division’s inquiry, improvement, and impact efforts. Dr. Strine-Patterson earned a Ph.D. in Strategic Leadership with a concentration in Postsecondary Analysis & Leadership from James Madison University. She also earned a Masters of Science in Higher Education Administration from Syracuse University, and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Ohio State University.

    Ellissa Brooks Nelson, Ph.D.

    Divisional Director, Student Affairs Research and Assessment

    University of North Carolina at Charlotte

    Dr. Ellissa Brooks Nelson currently serves as the Divisional Director for Student Affairs Research and Assessment at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. She has over 15 years of experience in program evaluation, assessment, strategic planning, data management, and educational research. She has held leadership positions within local government, higher and secondary education, and non-profit sectors. Dr. Brooks Nelson is currently leading efforts within the Division of Student Affairs in building an integrated system of Student Affairs data to inform the impact of Student Affairs on student success. She is passionate about helping student affairs program staff tell their story of program impact and to identify opportunities to better serve students.

    Dr. Brooks Nelson has achieved numerous peer-reviewed publications and has presented at state, regional, and national conferences. She is actively involved in numerous professional organizations and is currently serving as the VP of Profession Advancement on the 2023 Student Affairs Assessment Leaders Board. She received her bachelor’s degree from Appalachian State University and her master’s and Ph.D. degrees from UNC Charlotte.

    Student data has long been integrated into a university data ecosystem from admissions (e.g., demographics) and curricular experiences (e.g., course registration, G.P.A.); however, co-curricular and extracurricular experiences have generally been dispersed in different department third-party systems, spreadsheets, or paper and pen sign-in sheets. Often, the time it takes to clean, match, analyze, and visualize this dispersed data is time intensive and does not match the skills of most student affairs practitioners. This means that by the time data is visualized, it is largely done to describe the student involvement and utilization of services for yesterday’s student - not today’s student.

    Building a student affairs data lake supports an integrated data and analytics ecosystem that allows student affairs to create real-time data visualizations that are trusted and timely. This supports student affairs’ ability to inquire, improve, and share impact stories about current students. The increasing demand for fast, high-quality data has inspired the presenters to evolve their way of thinking, doing, and transforming the work of student affairs assessment by building a student affairs data lake that is a cornerstone of their practice. Come learn how your department or division can approach building a data lake to create real-time data visualizations that support inquiry, improvement, and impact.

    Learning Outcomes: 

    1. Articulate the benefit to building an integrated data system, including the types of data visualizations that can be created.
    2. Identify the key advocates and partners to build an integrated data system at any institution.
    3. Articulate the process for building a standard data collection protocol for a department and division.

    Questions? Contact NASPA Advisory Services at practices@naspa.org.

    Registered for the live webinar but unable to attend? A recording of the webinar will be available for registrants 365 days after the live webinar.

    NASPA has been approved by the Higher Education Consortium for Student Affairs Certification to provide CE credit for Certified Student Affairs Educators (CSAEd). NASPA is solely responsible for all aspects of this program.

    Guidelines for earning CE credit: 

    1 CE is awarded for attending this live session. 

    No partial credit will be rewarded. 

    Participants must also complete the feedback survey in the Online Learning Community.

    Credit is available for attending the live session and viewing the on-demand recording. 

    To receive CSAEd credit, attendees must complete the Feedback Survey in the online event offering the certification. Once the survey is completed, your Certificate will be available in the event modules. The Certificate of Completion, which will show the event and credit earnings, is available for download and/or print from the event in your Online Learning Community.

  • Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/28/2024

    Students are coming to our campuses with core issues that impact their learning including lack of basic needs. This webinar will discuss potential opportunities for meeting the basic needs of our students in a centralized system through a food pantry + model and the positive impact on student success.

    Dr. Ricky Tompkins

    Director of the Center for Student Success

    Arkansas Community Colleges

    Dr. Ricky Tompkins, Director of the Center for Student Success for Arkansas Community Colleges, works to improve access and opportunities for students working with the twenty-two Arkansas two-year colleges and national organizations. Before joining Arkansas Community Colleges in 2022, he served for over 10 years as Vice President for Learning and Chief Academic Officer at NorthWest Arkansas Community College, where he helped students achieve their dreams in building better lives for themselves and their families.

     
    Dr. Tompkins has taught on the university level, published in academic and professional journals, and presented at higher education meetings and conferences across the United States. He was a 2007 and 2009 Bellwether Award Finalist for Community College innovation, graduate of the Executive Leadership Institute sponsored by the League for Innovation in the Community College, and completed Arkansas Leader, a Command School sponsored by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Criminal Justice Institute of the University of Arkansas System.

     
    He holds a Doctor of Education in Higher Education from the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, a Master of Liberal Arts from Henderson State University, and a Bachelor of Arts from East Texas Baptist University.

    Students are coming to our campuses with core issues that impact their learning including lack of basic needs. This webinar will discuss potential opportunities for meeting the basic needs of our students in a centralized system through a food pantry + model and the positive impact on student success. Four Arkansas colleges, supported by Arkansas Community Colleges and the ECMC Foundation, piloted a more comprehensive usage of the food pantry as a centralized location for accessing and learning about additional resources and services. There are several takeaways from the project that will be discussed in the webinar.

    • Students accessing the new food pantry model are 6 to 8 percentage points more likely than students not accessing the pantry to be enrolled one semester and one year later, and to earn a credential.
    • Low-income students, adult students, and students of color are more likely to access campus food pantries, driven by colleges’ targeted outreach efforts to key student groups.
    • The notable academic benefits of the new food pantry model are present for Pell recipients, for adults, and for students of color – with especially high proportional increases in credential attainment for students of color who access campus pantries.

    Learning Outcomes:

    1. Participants will learn more about the comprehensive food pantry + model utilizing current resources including SNAP, TANF, and other available resources.
    2. Participants will learn about the pilot implementation of comprehensive food pantries at 4 Arkansas institutions and the positive academic results.
    3. Participants will become more familiar with the ASPEN led 2GEN approach to meeting the needs of whole families for academic success.

    NASPA has been approved by the Higher Education Consortium for Student Affairs Certification to provide CE credit for Certified Student Affairs Educators (CSAEd). NASPA is solely responsible for all aspects of this program.

    Guidelines for earning CE credit: 

    1 CE is awarded for attending this live session. 

    No partial credit will be rewarded. 

    Participants must also complete the feedback survey in the Online Learning Community.

    Credit is available for attending the live session and viewing the on-demand recording. 

    To receive CSAEd credit, attendees must complete the Feedback Survey in the online event offering the certification. Once the survey is completed, your Certificate will be available in the event modules. The Certificate of Completion, which will show the event and credit earnings, is available for download and/or print from the event in your Online Learning Community.

  • Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/09/2024

    Heading into 2024, student affairs administrators will be challenged in responding to student situations involving strongly held political identification; these situations will often pit First Amendment protections against messages conveying microaggressions. This webinar focuses on accomplishing your work as a student affairs administrator around sensitive topics while also balancing your own political views and activity. A case study approach is used to facilitate self-reflection about balancing your personal views with your public work.

    Marc H. Shook

    Associate Vice President, Dean of Students, Deputy Title IX Coordinator

    University of South Carolina, Columbia

    Marc Shook, Ph.D., J.D., currently serves as the Associate Vice President, Dean of Students, and Deputy Title IX Coordinator at the University of South Carolina. Prior to coming to USC in 2018, he was the Vice President for Student Affairs at LaGrange College. He has held student affairs positions at University of Texas at Austin, University of Alabama, University of Virginia, and Presbyterian College. At USC, he and Dr. Edwards have engaged in substantive work to rewrite all university policies impacting the use of space on campus and created SEED (Safely Engaging in Expression Delegates), a team of volunteers that staff demonstrations. As a member of a Faculty Senate Ad Hoc Committee on freedom of expression, he took a leadership role in publishing the first university statement of academic freedom and freedom of expression. He is a regular consultant and presenter on matters pertaining freedom of expression on campus. Dr. Shook teaches in the Higher Education Student Affairs master’s program at USC, including classes on higher education law and governance. He holds a Ph.D. in higher education administration from the University of Virginia, a J.D. from the University of Alabama School of Law, and a B.A. from Southern Methodist University.

    Anna Edwards

    Associate Vice President for Student Life and Chief of Staff to the VPSA

    University of South Carolina, Columbia

    Anna Edwards, PhD, serves as chief of staff for student affairs and academic support, and associate vice president for student life at the University of South Carolina. As chief of staff, Dr. Edwards leads projects that advance the strategic direction of the division. As AVP for Student Life, Dr. Edwards provides leadership to the student leadership and service center; fraternity and sorority life; multicultural student affairs; off-campus living and neighborhood relations; parent and family programs; the Russell House University Union; and student media. At USC, she and Dr. Shook have engaged in substantive work to rewrite all university policies impacting the use of space in a manner that would allow the university to achieve a green rating by FIRE. She and Dr. Shook are also the two senior student affairs administrators who provide student oversight and guidance in matters of student protest at the university (which occurred more over the past three months than either would have preferred). Dr. Edwards earned a PhD in educational administration and master's in higher education and student affairs from the University of South Carolina and a bachelor's in political science and speech and communication studies from Clemson University.

    Adrian Anderson

    Coordinator of Academic Integrity and Student Conduct

    University of South Carolina, Columbia

    Adrian Anderson is the coordinator of Academic Integrity and Student Conduct at the University of South Carolina. He is a new professional who has found a passion for educating and supporting students through life’s challenges. In his role he aims to bring a sense of compassion to students while still holding them accountable for their actions. It is his goal to make every interaction with a student one so that both he and the student take away a bit of new knowledge or understanding of whatever the subject matter may be. At USC, Adrian is a member of the SEED Team (Safely Engaging in Expression Delegates), where he staffs protests and demonstrations on campus and also works with students on better understanding the responsibilities that come with honoring the First Amendment on a public university campus.

    Tierney Bates

    Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs

    University of South Carolina Upstate

    Dr. Tierney J. Bates has established himself as national thought leader, speaker, networker, career coach, innovator, and voice on diversity, equity, inclusion, and GENERATION NOW! He has given over 215 keynote talks, presentations and workshops. With over 20+ years in higher education, he has progressed from entry level to senior level administration providing leadership, vision, and responsibility for strategic initiatives and solutions in student services, diversity & inclusion, career services/workforce development, recruitment, and fundraising. He is currently the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs at the University of South Carolina Upstate and was formerly at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill as Assistant Vice Chancellor for Special Projects & Executive Director and has served in leadership roles at Virginia Union University, North Carolina Central University, University of Louisville, University of Tennessee, and Bowling Green State University.

    This presentation combines two research agendas that the lead presenter has been working on for several years: the role of a student affairs administrator in advancing diversity of opinion on campus (or least permitting space for the sharing of multiple ideas) and student affairs response in situations that involve protest or bias incidents. This presentation is focused on how student affairs administrators can maintain professionalism in their work with students while also holding strong personal opinions/beliefs on controversial topics. Although the presentation title asks the question, “can we find a balance,” the reality is that there is no way to find a balance between freedom of expression, viewpoint diversity, and microaggressions that will make 100% of people happy in all situations. There will be bias incidents that involve constitutionally protected expression; in these situations, student affairs administrators cannot expel a student and this results in a subpopulation of the institution left feeling slighted and unprotected. So, while there is no perfect way to balance our current Generation Z’s need for protection, strict enforcement of First Amendment protections, and perceptions that freedom of expression is another way to condone microaggressions, student affairs administrators can and should act professionally and ethically.

    This presentation will directly address the realities of partisan politics on campus among student groups and, in particular, the political views of student affairs administrators themselves (two recent studies have demonstrated that student affairs administrators are more liberal in their leanings than even our faculty). Heading into 2024, there is no practical way that student affairs administrators will not be challenged, not only in responding to students and student incidents on campus, but also in maintaining professionalism while holding strong personal views as well. Underlying the examination of an administrator’s professional behavior, differences based on campus environment as well as generational bias will be addressed because these factors are highly influential. The presenters, although close in age, represent diversity in political ideologies, gender, ethnicity, and career paths which permit them to discuss how these issues play out at the public, private, and HBCU level. The presentation uses a case study approach to address politically sensitive topics in a non-confrontational and non-judgmental environment. As referenced below, audience members with high interest in this subject matter will also be exposed to a lengthy list of references and recommended readings on these topics for this own personal research.

    Learning Outcomes:

    1. Attendees will be exposed to literature, both through the presentation and list of recommended readings, which will contribute to their understanding of these topics.

    2. Attendees will participate in a case study exercise that will encourage self-reflection.

    3. Attendees will engage in a case study exercise that will expose them to different opinions and reactions than their own.

    4. Attendees will learn list of steps that student affairs administrators can take to find a balance that may influence professional behavior.

    NASPA has been approved by the Higher Education Consortium for Student Affairs Certification to provide CE credit for Certified Student Affairs Educators (CSAEd). NASPA is solely responsible for all aspects of this program.

    Guidelines for earning CE credit: 

    1 CE is awarded for attending this live session. 

    No partial credit will be rewarded. 

    Participants must also complete the feedback survey in the Online Learning Community.

    Credit is available for attending the live session and viewing the on-demand recording. 

    To receive CSAEd credit, attendees must complete the Feedback Survey in the online event offering the certification. Once the survey is completed, your Certificate will be available in the event modules. The Certificate of Completion, which will show the event and credit earnings, is available for download and/or print from the event in your Online Learning Community.

  • Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 04/24/2024 at 2:00 PM (EDT)

    In this webinar, you will learn how to blend alcohol education, pedagogy, and marketing strategies to create engaging, hands-on, harm-reduction programs that fit into your institution’s existing alcohol education framework!

    Lydia Coulson

    Communications Specialist

    University of Nebraska - Lincoln

    Lydia completed her B.S. in Bilingual Elementary Education at Illinois State University and her M.Ed at Marquette University in Student Affairs and Higher Education before going on to serve as Assistant Director for Community Standards and Wellbeing at Creighton University and then Alcohol and Drug Prevention Project Manager at University of Nebraska – Lincoln.

    As Alcohol and Drug Prevention Project Manager, Lydia combined her understanding of student behaviors around alcohol with her background in education to develop highly engaging programs tailored to Gen Z students that they want to engage in. While continuing her education in Strategic Marketing, Lydia tied the programmatic offerings to alcohol safety campaigns on UNL’s campus to develop a cohesive, engaging, easy-to-recall alcohol education experience for students.

    Lydia lives in Lincoln, NE with her husband and dog, Mocha. In her free time, Lydia enjoys cooking, working out, and hosting unnecessarily over-the-top events for friends. Friends ask her what her next race is, colleagues ask her if she’s ever going to stop being a student (the answer is the Spring Forward 5k and probably not)

    Let the Good Times Roll aims to create a fun, comfortable, and engaging environment for students to learn lessons about alcohol that will stay with them long-term. This is a harm-reduction program, meaning that students learn realistic and applicable information about how to be safer around alcohol. Lydia’s unique interdisciplinary background spanning education, student discipline, and marketing and communications positions her to develop highly engaging educational programs that students are excited to participate in and will walk away from with practical lessons they can implement. Let the Good Times Roll is intended to complement existing alcohol education strategies and is built on the primary strategy of “skills building” within the College AIM.

    Learning Outcomes:

    1. Understand how hands-on, skill-building activities fit with a larger alcohol prevention curriculum
    2. Learn how to develop engaging, hands-on activities and modify them to students' educational needs
    3. Understand how to leverage student trends and interests to create highly engaging programs

    NASPA has been approved by the Higher Education Consortium for Student Affairs Certification to provide CE credit for Certified Student Affairs Educators (CSAEd). NASPA is solely responsible for all aspects of this program.

    Guidelines for earning CE credit: 

    1 CE is awarded for attending this live session. 

    No partial credit will be rewarded. 

    Participants must also complete the feedback survey in the Online Learning Community.

    Credit is available for attending the live session and viewing the on-demand recording. 

    To receive CSAEd credit, attendees must complete the Feedback Survey in the online event offering the certification. Once the survey is completed, your Certificate will be available in the event modules. The Certificate of Completion, which will show the event and credit earnings, is available for download and/or print from the event in your Online Learning Community.

  • Get access to all 9 webinars in the 2024 PRACTICES Professional Development Series! Click on on the package title to view all of the webinars included.

    The NASPA Advisory Services PRACTICES Professional Development Series offers nine 60-minute webinars focused on topics spanning across our signature framework, PRACTICES. The framework focuses on student affairs and services’ policies, resources, alignment and partnerships with academic affairs, compliance, technology, inclusion, community, evidence-based practices, and student success efforts. This webinar series is a flexible, effective way to provide a comprehensive professional development series to your staff.

    PRICE

    Members:  $349

    Non-members $599

  • Includes a Live Web Event on 05/08/2024 at 12:00 PM (EDT)

    Learn how we matured two Cornell University staff leadership groups – the University Students Services Leaders (USSL) and Professional Academic Advising Leaders (PAAL) – through the pandemic to create the conditions for stronger partnerships between colleagues in colleges/schools and university student affairs offices.

    Miranda Swanson

    Associate Dean for Student Services, College of Engineering

    Cornell University

    Miranda Swanson joined Cornell Engineering in 2017 as Associate Dean for Student Services. Her portfolio includes Engineering Admissions, Engineering Advising, Engineering Career Center, Engineering Learning Initiatives, and the Engineering Registrar, as well as support for Diversity Programs in Engineering. She works with college leadership to prioritize Cornell Engineering’s undergraduate goals, represents the college on university initiatives, and collaborates with partners across Cornell to support student success. Prior to Cornell, Miranda spent 16 years in graduate student affairs at the University of Chicago, most recently serving five years as Dean of Students in the Physical Sciences Division. At UChicago, she also served as a Dean-on-Call, Sexual Assault Dean-on-Call, and Bias Response Team member. Miranda holds a BFA from the University of Nebraska at Omaha and a MA in Humanities from the University of Chicago. From January 2018 to June 2022 she chaired Cornell's University Student Services Leaders (USSL) group.

    Liane Fitzgerald

    Director of Advising, College of Engineering

    Cornell University

    Liane Fitzgerald joined Cornell University in 2016 as Director of Engineering Advising. She earned her B.S. in Professional and Technical Communication from Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) and her M.S. in Academic Advising from Kansas State University. Preceding Cornell Engineering, Liane spent five years as the Manager of Student Services, and seven years prior as a Senior Academic Advisor, both for the Computer Science Department at RIT. From July 2020 to June 2023 she chaired the Professional Academic Advising Leaders (PAAL) group at Cornell. In 2022 her PAAL colleagues nominated her for Cornell University President's Awards for Employee Excellence "Thoughtful Leader Award."

    The goals of this webinar are to share two case studies from Cornell University in which existing staff leadership groups were evolved to become more effective platforms for cross-campus collaboration, and challenge participants to consider ways in which they might leverage existing structures or experiment with new ones in order to grow partnerships between academic and student affairs colleagues.

    Each of the presenters served as chair of a key staff leadership group during the pandemic and helped expand membership to include student affairs partners from university offices. These standing groups have become a space for important cross-unit conversations, as well as the jumping off point for new collaborations and partnerships. The impact has been an improvement in overall internal communications, better alignment of policies and processes across the institution, mitigation of perceived tensions between academic and student affairs, and a stronger overall sense of community.

    Learning Outcomes:

    1. Participants will understand the impact of a standing committee/group structure as a platform for partnership and collaboration.

    2. Participants will reflect on the case studies to consider ways in which existing structures on their campuses might be leveraged to deepen collaborations and partnerships.

    3. Participants will reflect on the case studies to consider ways in which experimenting with new structures on their campuses might fill gaps in communication and/or collaboration between student and academic affairs units.

  • Includes a Live Web Event on 05/22/2024 at 3:00 PM (EDT)

    This webinar will provide a blueprint for creating engaging online panels highlighting students with disabilities to promote equity and foster an inclusive campus. This will include how to recruit, support, and market an equal access panel on your campus to promote student support and a culture of disability engagement.

    Michael Eynon

    Testing Coordinator

    Sonoma State University

    Michael Eynon joined Disability Services for Students during the summer of 2018 and has been involved at Sonoma State University (SSU) in some capacity since the fall of 2005. He is an SSU alumni, graduating with a B.A. in Psychology and Theatre Arts in 2010. Michael received his Master’s degree in December 2014 in Counseling Psychology with an emphasis in Drama Therapy from the California Institute of Integral Studies in San Francisco. While at SSU, Michael has worked as a summer mentor, student assistant, and outreach advisor for the pre-college TRIO program Academic Talent Search from 2007-2016. Michael served the TRIO Student Support Services program United for Success for the 2017-2018 academic year as a College Support Coach assisting first-generation, income eligible, and students with disabilities with time management, stress management, and other academic needs.

    Michael is also a Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist (LMFT) since June of 2018 though he does not provide therapy in his current role. Michael completed all of his practice hours working primarily with middle and high school students and their families in the Novato area of Marin County, CA. He enjoys advocating for educational access for students with disabilities and first generation and/or low-income students

    The number of students with disabilities on college campuses is growing. They are often the largest minority on campus yet also the most overlooked and invisible. This program will explore the start to finish process of how to build a student panel so students with disabilities can effectively communicate their message to the entirety of campus. It will review the recruiting process and how to support students with disabilities in disclosing very personal material. The structure of the panel will be discussed and universal design will be accentuated to display how students have equal access to providing their responses. Participants in the program will have the opportunity to ask questions and discuss how this style of program could be implemented and leave the presentation with a handout of potential questions to ask a panel. How to market the panel discussion will also be discussed.

    Learning Outcomes:

    1. Learn to utilize case study video of disability student panel discussions to recreate program at participant’s own campus. 
    2. Gain confidence in recruiting and preparing students with disabilities to speak on personal material.
    3. Comprehend the difficulties that students with disabilities face at college campuses.

    4.Engage students with disabilities on campus for this exciting opportunity

    5. Understand methods of marketing panel to campus at large.

  • Includes a Live Web Event on 06/03/2024 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    Where do you begin to develop a structure of assessment within a division that has operated without one? This webinar will focus on taking attendees through the foundational year of building structure and staff capacity for assessment at a community college's division of student affairs. Included are steps to teach learning outcome development in the co-curricula. There will be visuals on assessment plans, tools used to teach assessment and data literacy through an equity lens.

    Dr. Chrissy L. Davis Jones

    Vice President, Student Success and Chief Enrollment Officer

    HACC Central Pennsylvania's Community College

    Dr. Chrissy Davis Jones currently serves as the vice president for Student Success and chief enrollment officer at Harrisburg Area Community College (HACC) in Central Pennsylvania with nearly 25 years of experience at various post-secondary institutions, and with 18 of those years focused on developing, restructuring, and implementing student success-related programs. 

    Since Chrissy arrived at HACC, she has quickly made an impact by securing a 2.3-million-dollar Title 3 SIP Grant to transform the first-year experience for greater student success. She also oversaw the selection of HACC becoming one of seven colleges selected to become an Achieving the Dream institution in 2022 - focusing on whole college transformation for student success and data literacy. Lastly, Dr. Davis Jones established and co-leads the College's strategic enrollment planning committee. Her focus on the implementation of a collegewide strategic enrollment plan with student access and success at the center led to an increase in HACC's fall-to-fall and fall-to-spring retention for the first time in 10 years. 

    Dr. Davis Jones is considered a systems thinker; this coupled with her research and data-informed approach, has led to Chrissy being asked to serve as a consultant to higher education institutions in need of support to facilitate change.

    Angela M. Campbell

    Assistant Vice President, Assessment, Planning and Strategy

    HACC Central Pennsylvania's Community College

    Angela M. Campbell, Ph.D., LPC serves as the Assistant Vice President of Assessment, Planning and Strategy. She is responsible for planning, managing strategic initiatives, process improvements and quality assurance projects that improve Student Success and Enrollment Management (OSSEM) program performance. Angela works closely with OSSEM executives and collaborates across the college to establish objectives, develop and implement short-and-long term strategies, oversees Assessment for the Division, and supports a model for institutional capacity building in data literacy. She serves as the co-chair of strategic enrollment management and collaborates with other college leaders for Institutional Effectiveness.

    Angela has worked at HACC Central Pennsylvania’s Community College for 20 years serving in various roles and most recently in her current position for the past three years. As Co-Chair of SEM, she assisted in the development and implementation of a plan that lead to an increase in our F2F and F2S retention at the college for the first time in 10 years. Angela was recently nominated for the Building a Culture of Assessment Award by SAAL - Student Affairs Assessment Leaders organization.

    Angela earned her Ph.D. from Western Michigan University in Psychology, Applied Behavior Systems Analysis with an emphasis in Educational Systems.

    Shelly Blanchette

    Director, Student Success Operations and Strategy

    HACC Central Pennsylvania's Community College

    Shelly Blanchette, M.S., LPC serves as the Director of Student Success Operations and Strategy at HACC, Central Pennsylvania’s Community College. She is responsible for monitoring enrollment metrics and honing leading indicators to better predict and track progression toward enrollment targets. Shelly leverages data-informed insights and collaborative partnerships for process improvements, to pilot programs, and identify strategic interventions leading to student success and sustainable enrollment health. 

    Shelly earned her B.S. in Human Development and Family Studies from the University of Connecticut and M.S. in Counseling from Shippensburg University. She has worked in higher education across various institution types for over 20 years both within student services and as an adjunct faculty member. Shelly credits her experience in overseeing the launching of student services at an expansion campus with readying her for the work she currently does.

    The webinar begins to answer three important questions about the process of developing assessment within student affairs, 1) Where are you? In other words, where is the institution with regard to what is currently in place. What is the current process, policy and procedure that exists? This means a situational analysis of what currently exists is at the foundation of the start. 2) Where do you need to be? It is important to begin with an end in mind. What would you or your supervisor like to see after building the process for conducting assessment has been developed? 3) What are the steps you need to take to get there? There will undoubtedly be differences based on institutional culture however, beginning the process by answering these three questions will be an excellent starting point for any assessment leader who is beginning to build a structure of assessment.

    Learning Outcomes:

    1. Outline tasks associated with building structure and staff capacity for assessment within student affairs
    2. Explain how to teach outcome development in the co-curricular with an emphasis on learning outcomes
    3. Name a “hidden” component required for staff to effectively conduct assessment
    4. Recognize one strategy to keep equity work infused in your work and at the forefront
  • Includes a Live Web Event on 06/13/2024 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    Research suggests that transfer students are an often overlooked population of students on our campuses. Utilizing Bronfrenbrenner’s Socio-ecological Model, this presentation seeks to provide student affairs professionals a framework with which they can more holistically connect with transfer students within their individual context.

    Joshua Braaten

    Senior Success Coach

    George Mason University

    Joshua Braaten attended West Virginia University and earned a Bachelor of Science in Sports Management – envisioning a career in the business sector of scholastic or collegiate sport. After graduating from WVU, Joshua began a profession in academia – but as an Academic Advisor at American Public University System where he developed a great passion for student services/coaching within higher education. He has now spent a decade working in a student services role at the collegiate level. Most recently, Joshua has been promoted to Senior Success Coach within the Success Coaching Unit at George Mason University.

    Rebecca Mattern

    Success Coach

    George Mason University

    Rebecca Mattern is a 2x Patriot, earning both her Bachelor’s degree in Integrative Studies and her Master’s degree in Counseling and Development from George Mason University. During her graduate program, she worked as a Graduate Assistant and Academic Coach with Learning Services and as the Graduate Career Counseling Intern with Career Services. Rebecca joined the Student Success Coaching team at George Mason in Summer 2022.

    Sam Hediger

    Success Coach

    George Mason University

    Sam Hediger is a PhD student at the George Mason Carter School for Peace and Conflict Resolution, working to better understand conflict systems and peacebuilding’s power to address them. While attaining his master’s degree in Conflict Resolution at Portland State University, he worked for three years as a Graduate Peer Mentor, supporting both students and faculty in their renowned University Studies undergraduate program. Sam is also a Student Success Coach at George Mason University.

    Flannery Wickham

    Success Coach

    George Mason University

    Flannery Wickham has been an ADVANCE student Success Coach working with matriculated students from Northern Virginia community college since the Summer of 2022. Before joining George Mason University, Flannery worked as a College Life Coach at her alma mater, Florida State University. Flannery moved to the NOVA region to attend graduate school at George Mason and just recently graduated with her Masters in Higher Education and Student Development.

    Transfer students are an integral part of campus communities across a wide variety of institutions in the US. The number of degree-seeking undergraduate students who were enrolled in postsecondary institutions as transfer students in 2020 was 1,243,471. Despite these large numbers, research suggest that transfer students are an often overlooked population of students on our campuses. Utilizing Bronfrenbrenner’s Socio-ecological Model, this presentation seeks to provide student affairs professionals a framework with which they can more holistically connect with transfer students within their individual context. By understanding each student’s micro-, meso-, and macrosystem outlined by Bronfrenbrenner, it is our hope that student affairs professionals will be better able to provide inclusive and holistic supports that can help transfer students not only remain in and graduate from college, but leave school a more fully developed person than when they arrived.

    Learning Outcomes:

    1. Identify the unique needs of transfer students
    2. Learn about the systems identified in Bronfenbrenner’s ecological model
    3. Use Bronfenbrenner’s ecological model to better understand the systemic factors that affect transfer students
    4. Reflect on their own role in the educational success of transfer students
    5. Recognize the importance of collaboration among student affairs professionals