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  • Contains 4 Component(s) Includes Multiple Live Events. The next is on 10/15/2024 at 2:00 PM (EDT)

    Clery Act Fundamentals demystify the aspects of the law that apply to student affairs roles like student conduct, housing, or prevention professionals, no matter your level of experience or responsibility. We will explain each component of the law’s requirements and tie them directly to the day-to-day responsibilities of student affairs positions.

    October 14- October 25, 2024

    Two-week course

    Presented by NASPA and Clery Center

    Clery Act Essentials for Student Affairs Professionals demystifies the aspects of the law that apply to student affairs roles like student conduct, housing, or prevention professionals, no matter your level of experience or responsibility. We will explain each component of the law’s requirements and tie them directly to the day-to-day responsibilities of student affairs practitioners. Course attendees will understand the actions they can take, policies they can write, and practices they can employ that support the implementation of the Clery Act campus-wide. Overall, Clery Act Essentials for Student Affairs Professionals provides a foundational overview of the basic requirements of the Clery Act, drawing from the statute, regulations, and current Department of Education guidance. This training provides an in-depth introduction to the Clery Act and is an ideal primer for our more advanced trainings, such as Virtual, In-Person, or Online Clery Act Training Seminars (CATS).

    Learning Outcomes

    • Internalize the building blocks of Clery crime statistics: 
      • Identify campus security authorities (CSAs) 
      • Name Clery Act geography categories 
      • Define and count Clery Act Crimes 
    • Distinguish between timely warnings and emergency notifications 
    • Understand the prevention, response, and disciplinary procedures requirements for dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking (DVSAS), including their intersections with Title IX. 
    • Apply knowledge of DVSAS policies and procedures requirements to the policy statement information compiled for the annual security report, recognizing its relationship to student conduct, housing, and prevention work.

    Course Pricing

    Member:           $649 (member price for NASPA and Clery Center members)

    Non-Member.    $849   


     Course Outline

    Session 1: Crime Statistics and Reporting

    • Campus Security Authorities
    • Overview of the Clery Act crime statistics
    • Clery Act geography
    • Reporting and your role

    Session 2: Timely Warnings and You

    • Applications, distinctions, and uses of Timely Warnings and Emergency Notifications
    • Timely warnings and the intersection with student conduct, housing, and prevention

    Session 3: Dating Violence, Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Stalking (DVSAS)

    • Prevention programs for DVSAS
    • Disciplinary and response procedures for DVSAS

    Session 4: The Annual Security Report (ASR)

    • Relationship between practice and policy statements
    • Annual Security Report workshop
    • Review the DVSAS components of the ASR and Timely Warnings

    Live Sessions

    Session 1: October 15, 2-4 pm 

    Session 2: October 17, 2-4 pm ET

    Session 3: October 22: 2-5 pm ET

    Session 4: October 24t: 1:30-4 pm ET

    This course will be synchronous and asynchronous, with weekly live sessions. Depending on the content and speakers of each live session, the session may be recorded for viewing at a later date. Attendance and participation in the live session are highly encouraged, as they offer an opportunity to engage in activities and knowledge sharing that will add to the learning experience. Receiving credit for this course is only available for live participation. 

    Course Commitment and Expectations

    This two-week course will require 4-7 hours each week with assignments, engagement, and live sessions. All participants are expected to contribute to discussions and be present during live sessions. The course requires participants to have access to a computer, wifi, and webcam. All live sessions will be via Zoom, providing presentation slides and closed captioning. 

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    Laura Egan

    Senior Director of Programs

    Clery Center

    Laura Egan oversees the development and implementation of programmatic offerings, including Clery Center membership benefits and consultation services, ensuring alignment with the organization’s mission and values. Laura provides strategic direction for program evaluation and the planning and growth of products, training, and services. She presents nationally and provides individualized support on compliance with and implementing Clery Act requirements, campus safety, compliance, and gender based violence and discrimination. Prior to joining Clery Center, Laura worked at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, PA, for five years, serving in both residence life and student conduct roles after working as a school counselor for three years within the School District of Philadelphia. Laura’s program development work at Clery Center has led to meaningful collaboration and partnerships with organizations like the Anti-Defamation League, International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (IACLEA), National Organization for Victim Assistance, the State University of New York’s Student Conduct Institute (SUNY SCI) and Victim Rights Law Center. Laura has contributed to Campus Safety Magazine, The Baltimore Sun, The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, and Christian Science Monitor. Laura earned a B.A. in Psychology from Villanova University and a M.A. in Education and Human Development from The George Washington University.

    Abigail Boyer

    Associate Executive Director

    Clery Center

    Abigail Boyer has been with Clery Center since 2012, becoming Associate Executive Director in 2015. She leads the Clery Center team in providing educational resources, training curriculum, and technical assistance tools to help improve campus safety nationwide. She manages the organization’s Office on Violence Against Women technical assistance grants designed to support institutions in enhancing their dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking prevention and response efforts. She also presents nationally on topics related to the Clery Act and campus safety. Prior to joining Clery Center, Abigail served as the Community Outreach Coordinator for The Crime Victims’ Center of Chester County, Inc., where she was instrumental in the development and implementation of programs targeted toward law enforcement, colleges and universities, and other students, parents, and community members. Abigail earned a B.A. in Political Science at West Chester University and an M.S. in Organization Development and Leadership with a concentration in Adult Learning and Training at Saint Joseph’s University. She has been a contributor to Campus Safety Magazine, The New York Times, The Washington Post, the LA Times, and the Huffington Post.

    Paul Hinkle

    Assistant Director of Programs

    Clery Center

    Paul leads the development and provision of Clery Center’s live and virtual interactive Clery Act Training Seminars to help institutions in their role of providing safe, educational environments and complying with the Clery Act. In addition, he creates and implements the annual National Campus Safety Awareness Month (NCSAM) programming each September. Prior to joining Clery Center, Paul spent seven years in student conduct and Title IX, working to enhance education, training, and compliance. He champions increasing transparency and understanding of the complexities of campus safety legislation and related university processes. Paul earned his M.Ed. in College Student Affairs Administration from the University of West Florida and a B.A. in English Literature and Secondary Education from Carthage College in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

    Cecilia Dockery

    Assistant Director of Programs

    Clery Center

    Cecilia develops and implements programs and training related to campus safety, with a focus on the areas of hazing, sexual assault, and fire safety, and also provides technical assistance to Clery Center members. Prior to joining Clery Center, Cecilia spent ten years in higher education, serving in student conduct roles for most of that time, as well as in Title IX and Housing. Cecilia earned a Bachelor of Science in Aquaculture from Florida Tech and a Master of Education in College Student Personnel Administration from the University of West Florida.

    Continuing Education Credits

    Participants who complete the course will be eligible for 9.5 Continuing Education (CE) credits in one of the following categories:  Core Student Affairs Educator Certification (CSAEd™), Student Affairs Educator-Student Conduct Administration (CSAEd-SC™), or Student Affairs Educator-Campus Housing and Residential Life (CSAEd-HRL™) .

    NASPA has been approved by the Higher Education Consortium for Student Affairs Certification to provide CE credit for Certified Student Affairs Educators (CSAEd). NASPA is solely responsible for all aspects of this program.

    Guidelines for earning CE credit: 

    9.5 CSAEd credits are awarded for completing this course. Completion includes attending all live sessions and completing the Feedback Survey. You can only receive 9.5 credit hours in ONE of the categories, not multiple.  

    No partial credit will be rewarded; full completion is required. 

    To receive CSAEd credit, attendees must complete the Feedback Survey in the online event offering the certification. Once the survey is completed, your Certificate of Completion will be available in the event modules. The Certificate of Completion, which will show the event and credit earnings, is available for download and/or print from the event in your Online Learning Community Dashboard.

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  • Contains 27 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes Multiple Live Events. The next is on 09/26/2024 at 12:00 PM (EDT)

    The question is not if but when. College campuses find themselves faced with a crisis at an alarming rate. Student affairs professionals are integral parts of the campus crisis response team. This course will give a broad overview of how student affairs professionals can best support their students and campus during crisis situations. Topics will include the foundations of crisis management, crisis management teams or emergency management teams, the creation of crisis management plans, communications during times of crisis, recovery following an incident, and relationships across the institution and with outside agencies.

  • New
    Contains 5 Component(s) Includes Multiple Live Events. The next is on 09/24/2024 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    Today, over 408,000 undocumented students in higher education face limited access to education and career opportunities. This course will focus on advocating for undocumented students entering and navigating higher education. By the end of the course, participants will become familiar with federal, state, and institutional policies that impact undocumented students’ education and career development.

    Sarah Kim

    Director of Community Engagement and Partnerships

    First Gen Empower

    Sarah Kim (she/her) is the Director of Community Engagement and Partnerships at First Gen Empower. She is also the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Edu Light, Inc., a career consulting firm for first-generation and immigrant students. With 6+ years of experience in Student Affairs and Career Services, she leads efforts to prepare first-generation and undocumented students for success beyond high school through tailored workshops and training educators. Sarah holds a Master’s in Higher Education, with a concentration in student affairs, from Boston College and a B.A. in Sociology from UCLA.

    Arabi Hassan

    Co-Founder

    First Gen Empower

    Arabi Hassan (she/her) is a first-generation Bangladeshi immigrant and the Co-Founder of First Gen Empower (FGE). She holds a bachelor’s degree in Sociology from UC Berkeley and a JD from Harvard Law School. She has 8+ years of experience advocating for immigrant communities through policy advocacy, direct legal representation, college and career advising, and mentorship. She also advises organizations such as Presidents’ Alliance on Higher Education and Immigration and Immigrants Rising. As a formerly undocumented immigrant, Arabi’s passion for advocating for undocumented students is shaped by her own experiences navigating the American education system while undocumented. 

    Ariana Aparicio Aguilar

    Ph.D. student University of California, Riverside

    University of California, Riverside

    Ariana is an immigrant from Mexico City, Mexico, who grew up in Northern California, where she obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology from Sonoma State University. Ariana also holds a Master of Arts degree in Education with a concentration in Higher Education from Harvard University. Currently, she is a third-year Ph.D. student in the Higher Education Administration and Policy program at the University of California, Riverside. Ariana has over ten years of experience working in higher education and the non-profit sector. Her professional career is influenced by her experiences navigating life and higher education in the U.S. as an undocumented and DACA recipient. Her research interests include undocumented graduate students, immigration, social justice advocacy, and access & retention of minoritized students in higher education.

    September 16- October 25, 2024
    Description

    Today, there are over 408,000 undocumented students in higher education who face limited access to education and career opportunities. This course will focus on advocating for undocumented students entering and navigating higher education. By the end of the course, participants will become familiar with federal, state, and institutional policies that impact undocumented students’ education and career development. Real-life case studies will be used throughout the course to help participants understand the challenges that undocumented students currently face and identify potential solutions to address those challenges within their respective roles.

    This will be an interactive course with activities, small group break-out sessions, and an end-of-the-course presentation.

    Learning Outcomes
    • Understand laws and policies at the state and federal levels that impact undocumented students’ access to college and career opportunities.
    • Create an action plan for developing programs and services that are inclusive of undocumented students through analyzing evidence-based best practices from higher education institutions and national immigrant-serving organizations.
    • Recognize organizations and initiatives around the U.S. working to make educational and professional opportunities accessible for undocumented students.

    Course Outline

    Week 1: An Introduction to the Undocumented Community 

    Week 2: Understanding State and Federal Laws and Policies Affecting Undocumented Students 

    Week 3: Access to higher education for undocumented students 

    Week 4: Supporting undocumented students’ career development 

    Week 5: Participant Presentations + Live Feedback 2 

    Week 6: Next Steps 


    Live Sessions

    All live sessions are scheduled for Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. ET. Sessions will be recorded; however, live participation is highly encouraged to get the most out of your experience. 

    September 24, 2024: 1:00 p.m.

    October 1, 2024: 1:00 p.m.

    October 8, 2024: 1:00 p.m.

    October 15, 2024: 1:00 p.m.

    October 22, 2024: 1:00 p.m.

  • Package
    Contains 5 Product(s)

    Elevate Training for NASPA Staff. Available live and on-demand.

    This course provides NASPA staff with short, high-intensity training on everything related to Elevate (Online Learning Community). The training package is divided into products based on specific processes that NASPA uses for all virtual learning. Registering for the package will automatically register you for every separate training (product). You can register for each product individually if you do not want to participate in the course (package). The training course consists of the following sections: 

    Elevate Overview and Introduction
    • Online Learning Community (OLC) Administration Site
      • Pages and Widgets: High Overview 
      • Accessing the Help/Support area of Elevate
      • Administrative Toolbar Overview and Functionality
    • User accounts
      • Finding Users, Administrative Privileges, and Logging in as a User
      • Resetting Quizzes 
    Products and Packages
    • Categories and Product Types: Basic Overview
      • How to edit site-wide and how we use them
    • Creating & Cloning Products
      • Creating a Product and Package (basic webinar and on-demand package)
      • Creating a multi-module product (short course or hub)
        • Learner flow and required for completion (what this means for the user)
        • Delayed product opening
      • Mass editing and importing products
    • Adding Components & Creating Component Sections
      • Component Types, Web content component (live and on-demand), Video Component, and Audio/MP3
      • Quiz and Survey Component, 
      • Web content  (live and on-demand), Video Components, and Audio/MP3
      • File Uploads, Discussion Boards, and Acknowledgments 
      • Verification Code, SCORM, and Live In-person Events
      • Add CE and Certificate component (Virtual process for CSAEd credits) and Certificate of Attendance CME, Multi-product, and CSAEd Certificate
    • Additional Product Functionality
      • Product Tabs, Adding Speakers, and Handouts
    Emailing and Communication
    • System-wide Emails, Email Templates, and When to Use them
    • Emailing Registrants and Speakers
    Coming Soon (early October): 
    • Pages and widgets
    • Building a conference or large multi-product event (symposium, summit, etc.)
    • Reports
    • Speaker Management
    • Sidebar
  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 09/20/2024 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    APA Style is the standard for student affairs writing, which makes it an important area of proficiency for new and experienced professionals. However, APA Style can be difficult to understand and apply. This webinar will provide an overview of APA Style along with suggestions and tips for applying it in practice.

    Knowledge of the APA Style guide will support the goals of any student affairs practitioner due to its application across a variety of written communication formats. If you are looking to publish your research or communicate findings more effectively, being able to apply the APA Style is necessary.

    The webinar will be presented by leaders in the NASPA Assessment, Evaluation, and Research Knowledge Community. During this session, the presenters will review the elements of APA Style, including the mechanics of style, grammar and usage, bias-free language guidelines, in-text citations, and more. The webinar will also provide an opportunity to practice and apply these skills. Attend this webinar to develop and advance your APA-style skills! 

    Learning Outcomes: 
    • Describe the scope and elements of APA Style.
    • Effectively recognize opportunities to rely upon APA style within their writing.  
    • Apply solutions to common challenges when using APA Style in student affairs.
    • Summarize the formatting and rules for setting up a research paper.

    Kim Kruchen

    University of Colorado Boulder

    Kim Kruchen-Spaulding has worked in higher education for the past 10 years in a variety of roles, including academic affairs, student activities, assessment, and strategic resources. She holds an M.Ed. from the University of Virginia where she interned for the Council for Advancement of Standards and conducted research. Kim served as the Director of the Office of Assessment & Planning in the Division of Student Affairs at CU Boulder from 2017-2022. In April 2022, she began a new role at CU Boulder as the Associate Director for Strategic Initiatives. Her current work focuses on change management, researching effective strategies that impact students, and developing reporting practices for the division.

    Shaun Boren

    University of Florida

    Shaun came to UF in 2017 to direct the new Office of Assessment and Research in its mission to champion a culture of evidence-based decision making for Student Life. Prior to this role Shaun served the University of West Florida for 12 years in a progression of experience including creating the Outdoor Adventures program, supervising Recreational Sports programming, instructing undergraduate and graduate courses, and managing assessment initiatives for Student Affairs. His leadership style and strategies for building assessment capacity draw from his bachelors in animal behavior, masters in experiential education, and doctorate in physical education and health.

    Erica Eckert

    Kent State University

    Erica Eckert, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Higher Education Administration in the College of Education, Health, and Human Services at Kent State University. Before becoming a faculty member, she served for 15 years in a variety of administrative roles managing assessment, accreditation, program review, technology and data systems, survey development and data analysis, and academic and admissions operations.  She teaches courses on technology, business and finance, and assessment and accreditation in higher education and co-authored Business Practices in Higher Education: A Guide for Today’s Administrators (2nd ed.)  Dr. Eckert’s research explores how higher education organizations navigate systems and structures, including assessment and accreditation.

    Darby Roberts

    Director, Student Affairs Planning, Assessment & Research

    Texas A&M University

    Darby Roberts, Ph.D. is director of Student Affairs Planning, Assessment & Research in the Division of Student Affairs at Texas A&M University. She has been working in student affairs assessment since 1998. As a faculty member in the Student Affairs Administration in Higher Education master’s program at Texas A&M, Darby has students submit professionally written documents in her student affairs assessment class. She has been actively involved in the NASPA Assessment, Evaluation, and Research Knowledge Community (twice as co-chair), as well as the Student Affairs Assessment Leaders organization. In 2023, she co-authored Student Affairs Assessment: Theory to Practice (2nd ed.) and co-edited Assessing Student Leadership, a monograph in the New Directions for Student Leadership series. She also co-edited Learning is Not a Sprint: Assessing and documenting student leader learning in cocurricular involvement. In the past several years, Darby has also contributed chapters to several books on student affairs assessment and student learning. She frequently presents at conferences and consults with campuses on their assessment needs. 

    Shannon Dean-Scott

    Associate Professor

    Texas State University

    Shannon Dean-Scott, Ph.D. is an associate professor in the student affairs in higher education program at Texas State University. She has taught research and assessment courses for 10 years and was a practitioner leading various assessment projects prior to her faculty role. She is involved in the NASPA Assessment, Evaluation, and Research Knowledge Community and co-edited the book, Using the CAS professional standards: Diverse examples of practice which was endorsed by NASPA, ACPA, and CAS. Her current research focuses on multicultural consciousness of undergraduate students, assessment practices, and teaching pedagogies.

  • Contains 15 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 09/04/2024 at 2:00 PM (EDT)

    This short course explores the crucial intersection of campus design and mental health in higher education.

    Dates: July 22 - September 4, 2024
    Description

    This essential short course explores the crucial intersection of campus design and mental health in higher education. As we navigate an academic landscape marked by increasing mental health challenges, it’s clear that depression and other mental health concerns, compounded by academic stress, lead to negative outcomes, including higher dropout rates. This course highlights the vital role of administrators and student affairs staff in fostering a culture of wellness and understanding on their college or university campuses. Through comprehensive insights from experts, we'll explore various mental health models, assess campus-specific needs, and develop actionable, sustainable strategies to enhance campus-wide mental health. Join us on this transformative journey to better support your students and colleagues, and to create a thriving, supportive academic environment.

    Learning Outcomes
    1. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the multifaceted nature of mental health and well-being on college campuses, including relevant challenges, terminology, and models. 
    2. Develop the ability to assess campus-specific mental health needs through data analysis, self-study, and policy review.
    3. Understand the roles and responsibilities of various campus and community stakeholders in promoting mental health and well-being, fostering collaboration for a holistic approach.
    4. Synthesize the course content to create a campus plan that addresses mental health needs, exhibits appropriate intervention selection and adaptation, and ensures long-term sustainability for the benefit of the entire campus community.
    Course Outline

    Section 1 - Introduction: Mental Health and Well-being on the College Campus

    Section 2 - Campus Assessment and Building a Community of Care

    Section 3 - Developing and Implementing a Campus-Wide Strategy: Policies, Procedures, and Programs

    Section 4 - Strategy Evaluation and Program Sustainability

    Course Live Session Dates

    Wednesday, September 4, 2024        2:00 p.m. (EDT)

    Course Commitment and Expectations

    The course will require 1-2 hours per week with assignments, engagement, and live sessions. All participants are expected to contribute to discussions and be present during live sessions. The course requires participants to have access to a computer, wifi, and webcam. All live sessions will be via Zoom, providing presentation slides and closed captioning. 

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    Guidelines for earning CE credit: 

    5 CSAEd Core CEs are awarded for completing this course. Completion includes viewing all recordings, attending all live sessions, and completing the Feedback Survey. 

    No partial credit will be awarded; full completion is required. 

    Participants must also complete the feedback survey in the Online Learning Community.

    Credit is only available for attending the live session.

    To receive CSAEd credit, attendees must complete the Feedback Survey in the online event offering the certification. Once the survey is completed, your Certificate will be available in the event modules. The Certificate of Completion, which will show the event and credit earnings, is available for download and/or print from the event in your Online Learning Community.

    NASPA has been approved by the Higher Education Consortium for Student Affairs Certification to provide CE credit for Certified Student Affairs Educators (CSAEd). NASPA is solely responsible for all aspects of this program.

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  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 08/13/2024 at 2:00 PM (EDT)

    Despite efforts to create safer campuses, rates of sexual violence remain consistent. First-generation college students are 1.3 times more likely to experience such incidents and are less likely to report them due to unique challenges. Join NASPA’s Culture of Respect Collective to learn trauma-informed best practices and enhance support and prevention initiatives for first-generation student survivors.

    Despite higher education institutions' efforts to create safer campuses, rates of sexual violence remain consistent. First-generation college students are 1.3 times more likely to experience sexual violence compared to their peers and are less likely to report their assaults to on-campus resources. This is due to a lack of knowledge about available support, the absence of a knowledgeable support system to navigate the complex Title IX process, and other unique challenges. The increased risk for victimization, underreporting, and additional support barriers can significantly negatively impact first-generation students’ academic performance and overall well-being. This ongoing research highlights the critical need for all student affairs professionals to be equipped with the knowledge and resources necessary to properly respond to disclosures of sexual violence.

    NASPA’s Culture of Respect collaborates with educational institutions nationwide to end sexual violence through ongoing, expansive organizational change. During this webinar, Culture of Respect staff will engage participants in conversations to lead to a better understanding of the realities of sexual violence and its pervasive impact on survivors. Using case scenarios, a game-based learning platform, and discussion prompts, participants will recognize various trauma-informed best practices for interacting with students and identify ways to increase their involvement in on-campus sexual violence prevention initiatives. Together, we can strengthen our support services for first-generation student survivors and make our campuses safer, more accessible, and equitable for all.

    Learning Outcomes:

    Participants will:

    • Understand the short and long term consequences of sexual violence
    • Recognize the different trauma-informed best practice principles
    • Identify three ways to become more involved in sexual violence prevention and response on their college or university campus

    Jessica Henault

    Program Coordinator for NASPA's Culture of Respect Collective

    NASPA - Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education

    Jessica Henault, MS (she/her) is NASPA’s program coordinator for the Culture of Respect Collective. Before joining NASPA, Jessica was Kansas State University’s first violence prevention specialist, where she developed and implemented a university-wide violence prevention plan. She is passionate about improving the safety and well-being of college campuses and holds a master’s degree in Counseling and Student Development. Currently, Jessica is a doctoral student at Kansas State University studying Prevention Sciences, focusing her research on the intersection of sexuality, sexual agency, and political resistance within erotic fanfiction.

    Jennifer E. Henkle

    Director, Sexual Violence Prevention and Response

    NASPA - Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education

    Jennifer E. Henkle, MSW, LMSW (she/her/hers) is the director for sexual violence prevention and response. Jennifer oversees the Culture of Respect initiative and guides NASPA's work as a collaborative partner towards resolving systems of gender- and power-based violence. She is a Licensed Master's Social Worker (LMSW) in the state of Virginia and has formerly worked in residence life, survivor advocacy and respondent services, campus sexual violence prevention and education, and higher education case management.

  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 08/01/2024 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    Join NASPA, the Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Division, and the Public Policy Division for this briefing about the evolving landscape and impact of state efforts to dismantle and divert institutional diversity, equity, and inclusion programs. Participants will learn about the policy landscape, review a new resource guide and hub, and engage in facilitated dialogue spaces.

    Join NASPA, the Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion Division, and the Public Policy Division for this briefing about the evolving landscape and impact of state efforts to dismantle and divert institutional diversity, equity, and inclusion programs. Participants will learn about the policy landscape, review a new resource guide and hub, and engage in facilitated dialogue spaces. 

    Amelia Parnell, Ph.D.

    President

    NASPA

    Dr. Amelia Parnell, who has recently assumed the presidency of NASPA–Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education, is an accomplished higher education executive and an internationally recognized thought leader regarding current issues and emerging trends in the field. She is a passionate advocate for higher education as a tool for personal advancement and impact, and she seeks opportunities to partner with organizations and individuals who share her sincere commitment to centering students' needs.

    As the vice president for research and policy for NASPA, Dr. Parnell leads many of the association's scholarly and advocacy-focused activities. During her eight-year tenure in this role, she has fostered genuine partnerships with college administrators, researchers, grantmakers, and other higher education professionals. Dr. Parnell’s previous policy and practitioner experiences include roles in association management, legislative policy analysis, internal audit, and TRIO programs. Her research portfolio includes studies of leadership in higher education, with a focus on college presidents and vice presidents.

    As a frequent keynote speaker at national and regional conferences, Dr. Parnell presents on topics related to student affairs, college affordability, student learning outcomes, and institutions' use of data and analytics. She has been quoted in The Wall Street Journal, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Inside Higher Ed, and PBS Newshour.

    Dr. Parnell recently completed four years of service on the Board of Directors for EDUCAUSE, where she was chair of the Finance & Investment Committee and the Audit Committee. She is also the chair of the Higher Education Equity Network (HEEN), a collective impact network representing more than 25 organizations at the forefront of addressing racial equity in higher education.

    Dr. Parnell enjoys her work as an adjunct instructor and campus lecturer because it helps her ground her work through enriching engagements with students and peers. She is energized by making complex concepts easy to understand, so she hosts her podcast, Speaking of College, a source of reliable answers to college-related questions. She is also the author of the book, You Are A Data Person, which she wrote to encourage all higher education professionals to discover and embrace their unique data identity.Amelia holds a Ph.D. in higher education from Florida State University and master’s and bachelor’s degrees in business administration from Florida A & M University.

    D’Najah Pendergrass Thomas (She/Her)

    Director of The Placement Exchange

    NASPA

    D’Najah Pendergrass Thomas (She/Her) is a practitioner whose work is centered around organizational behavior with a focus on recruitment, professional development, and career advancement. Committed to helping organizations and communities bring about transformational change in these areas, she currently serves as director of The Placement Exchange (TPE) - a partnership of ACUHO-I and NASPA, in collaboration with NACA, NODA, ASCA, and AFA. 

    Monica Nixon, Ed.D. (Moderator)

    Vice President, Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

    NASPA


    Monica Nixon serves as Vice President for Justice, Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion. Previously, she held diversity, equity, and inclusion and student affairs roles at Saint Joseph’s University, Seattle University, Colgate University, the University of Puget Sound, and the University of Virginia, for which she currently serves on the Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Access (IDEA) Fund alumni board.

    Monica received her Master of Arts in Counselor Education and her B.A. in English in 1995 from the University of Virginia. She earned a Doctorate of Education in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from the University of Washington, where her dissertation focused on the positionality and agency of women of color chief diversity officers in higher education institutions. Monica co-authored a chapter in the 2012 NASPA-published book Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Higher Education and has served actively with NASPA – Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education, ACPA – College Student Educators International, and the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education.

  • Contains 1 Component(s) Includes a Live Web Event on 08/01/2024 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    this course guides participants through the entire survey process step by step. This training will provide a blueprint for institutions that choose to administer a survey using only “in-house” resources or minimal external assistance. This training builds a foundation for further data collection and assessment strategies, including general climate surveys and analysis of internal sexual misconduct case data.

    July 28- August 26, 2024

    In 2014, the White House Task Force to Protect Students from Sexual Assault first advised American higher education institutions to conduct regular student sexual misconduct climate surveys. The Department of Justice called these climate surveys an important tool to gather knowledge about the scope and nature of sexual harassment and violence in their communities. In the following years, climate surveys have moved from a best practice to a mandate. Not only have around a dozen states passed legislation requiring the administration of regular climate surveys, but the 2021 reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act added a requirement for all colleges and universities to conduct a survey as well. In addition, multiple Canadian provinces and European countries have either mandated or strongly encouraged sexual misconduct climate surveys for their own institutions: this mandate to make assessment a core part of the work is taking hold across the globe.

    However, surveys not based on science and best practices may not accurately measure sexual misconduct. Universities may have both the capacity and the will to conduct meaningful climate surveys, but they might not be sure of where to start, how to conduct the survey, and what questions to ask. 

    In partnership with Rankin Climate, NASPA is providing a comprehensive course to meet that need: this course guides participants through the entire survey process step by step. This training will provide a blueprint for institutions that choose to administer a survey using only “in-house” resources or minimal external assistance. This training builds a foundation for further data collection and assessment strategies, including general climate surveys and analysis of internal sexual misconduct case data.

    Learning Outcomes
    • Understand how to balance legal mandates with institutional needs in conducting sexual misconduct climate surveys (SMCS).
    • Learn the best practices related to the assessment of SMCS from the research literature, specifically to (1) evaluate and select survey instrument(s), evaluate data collection and analysis strategies, and (3) reconcile data from different instruments historically used by the institution.
    • Organize information from across literature and institutions to determine the key to a successful SMCS administration at your home institution.
    • Evaluate different approaches to action planning and be able to apply the theory to data
    • Identify themes within and across survey results to develop clear action steps for immediate implementation.

    Course Outline

    • Week One: Introduction to Climate Surveys and Planning Your Process
      • History of Campus Climate Surveys and Sexual Misconduct Climate Surveys
      • Current Legal Landscape: Who has to do it, and what do we do?
      • What We Know From Current Research About Sexual Misconduct in Higher Education
      • What to Consider When Deciding to Conduct a Survey
      • Articulating Survey Goals
      • Working Within Your Budget
      • Looking Ahead to Future Administrative Decisions
    • Week Two: The Science Behind Surveys
      • Laying Out A Survey Approach: Do It Internally or Externally?
      • How to Choose a Survey Instrument
      • Switching Surveys and Reconciling Different Data
    • Week Three: Administration Nuts & Bolts
      • Forming a Climate Survey Working Group
      • Customizing a Survey Without Breaking the Measurements
      • Sample Approach or Census Approach
      • Whether or Not (and How) to Submit to IRB
      • Creating a Communications/Marketing Strategy and Toolkit
      • Incentives: What Works and Maximizing Your Budget
      • Conducting Data Analysis
      • Creating Data Dashboards
    • Week Four: Action and Community Engagement
      • Shifting from a Climate Survey Working Group to an Action Group
      • Overview of Public Health Strategies of Prevention and the Socio-Ecological Model
      • Synthesizing Other Institutional Data for Comparison and Context
      • Evaluating Different Approaches to Design Action Plans
      • How to Identify Your Key Findings
      • Creating Solution-Oriented Action Items to Address Key Findings
      • Sharing the Results with Your Community: How to Report Out
      • Solidify Assessment Plan for Future

    Live Sessions

    • August 1 from 1:00-3:00 (ET) 
    • August 8 from 1:00-3:00 (ET) 
    • August 15 from 1:00-3:00 (ET) 
    • August 22 from 1:00-4:00 (ET) 

    This course will be synchronous and asynchronous, with weekly live sessions. Depending on the content and speakers of each live session, the session may be recorded for viewing at a later date. Attendance and participation in the live session are highly encouraged, as they offer an opportunity to engage in activities and knowledge sharing that will add to the learning experience.

    Meredith M. Smith, JD, MS Ed

    Senior Vice President

    Rankin Climate

    Meredith Smith spent a decade working in Title IX and nearly two decades in higher education administration overall, serving as the Title IX Coordinator for the University of Virginia and the Assistant Provost for Title IX and Clery Compliance and the Sexual Misconduct Response/Title IX Coordinator at Tulane University. Meredith is a founding member of the Administrator Researcher Campus Climate Collaborative (ARC3) and works for the Victim Rights Law Center as a Department of Justice Violence Against Women grant consultant. She has participated in the Office on Violence Against Women roundtable on sexual violence adjudication and the American Bar Association’s recommendations on college sexual assault investigation and adjudication. She contributed a chapter to Addressing Violence Against Women on College Campuses (Temple University Press, 2017). She was also a guest editor of The Society for Public Health Education’s journal Health Education & Behavior‘s 2020 journal supplement on college sexual assault policy and prevention. She is currently serving on a National Science Foundation grant on sexual misconduct climate surveys. For her work on the Tulane Sexual Misconduct Climate Survey and subsequent culture change initiatives, she was honored with a 2019 Visionary Voice Award from the National Sexual Violence Resource Center. Meredith has a BA (magna cum laude) in English-Creative Writing from Miami University, a JD  from The Ohio State University, and a MS Ed in Administration and Policy from Northwestern University.

    Kevin Swartout, Ph.D.

    CEO and Partner

    Rankin Climate

    Kevin Swartout leads Rankin Climate, bringing deep research and academic expertise after spending more than 15 years teaching and conducting research on university campuses. Kevin received his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro with a concentration in social psychology. He most recently served as a professor in the Department of Psychology at Georgia State University, earning tenure in 2017 and achieving the rank of full professor in 2020. His research focuses heavily on the influencers and psychology of decision-making. A significant portion of his work has centered on identifying and engaging distinct and diverse subpopulations.

    Susan Rankin, Ph.D.

    President

    Rankin Climate

    Dr. Susan (Sue) Rankin retired from Pennsylvania State University in 2013, where she most recently served as an Associate Professor of Education and Associate in the Center for the Study of Higher Education. Dr. Rankin has presented and published widely on the intersections of identities and the impact of sexism, genderism, racism, and heterosexism in the academy and intercollegiate athletics. Dr. Rankin has collaborated with over 200 higher education institutions to implement campus climate assessments and develop strategic plans for social justice issues. In her advocacy work, Dr. Rankin is a founding member of the Consortium of Higher Education LGBT Resource Professionals, a network of professionals doing advocacy work for LGBT people on college campuses, and the Statewide Pennsylvania Rights Coalition, a network of individuals and organizations across the Commonwealth committed to securing and defending full civil rights for LGBT individuals. 

    Jess Neumann-Kersten, Ph.D.

    Managing Director, Research

    RW Jones Agency

    Jess manages research initiatives at the RW Jones Agency and uses her years of experience in higher education administration to support clients through evidence-based practices and mixed-methods research. Jess and her team most recently developed, fielded and analyzed the inaugural State of the CDO survey and report with the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education (NADOHE). She earned her Ph.D. in communication studies from the University of Denver and her bachelor’s degree in media, culture and communication, and gender and sexuality studies from New York University.

  • Contains 180 Component(s) Includes Multiple Live Events. The next is on 08/01/2024 at 8:00 AM (EDT)

    Certified Peer Education is now offered virtually in a Cohort format! Over three weeks, students will go through the CPE Curriculum online and at their own pace, engaging with their peers throughout the training.

    Over three weeks, students will go through the CPE training. CPE Modules consist of videos, reflection questions, discussion posts, and quizzes; these are all asynchronous and can be completed on a student's individual schedule. The quizzes are for practice purposes and are not graded. Discussion posts require you to post and reply to at least three other students' posts; you do not need to reply to move to the next activity, but you will need to complete the discussion to complete the CPE course and access the CPE Exam.

    • Week 1: Intro, Modules 1 & 2
    • Week 2: Modules 3, 4, 5, & 6
    • Week 3: Modules 7, 8, & Conclusion

     If you need any assistance, please utilize our CPE Help Desk for the fastest response. 


    NOTE: The August Cohort will begin at 8 AM ET on August 1 and conclude at 11 PM ET on August 31. All content must be finished by then to earn the CPE Certificate.