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  • Contains 4 Component(s)

    This moderated session will provide a contemporary portrait of how tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) are building campus ecologies and initiatives to support first-generation indigenous students. Panelists will discuss how their TCUs are sustaining and achieving student success and highlighting practices and considerations that non-tribal institutions should consider in supporting their first-generation indigenous students.

    Many indigenous college students are the first in their family to attend college. This webinar centers the practices of tribal colleges and universities (TCU’s) in developing student success initiatives. Of critical importance in supporting first-generation students is recognizing their intersecting identities and how this influences their college experience. The unique nature of TCU’s provides a strong example of the importance of linking cultural context to the development of student success initiatives. The work of practitioners at the College of the Muscogee Nation, Northwest Indian College, and Salish Kootenai College will share their stories of success and challenges to inspire campuses, regardless of institutional type, to strengthen cultural approaches to supporting first-generation indigenous student success. The Bringing Balance Back to the Higher Education Landscape: Power & Place Webinar Series and Virtual Symposium is focused on the breadth of balance provided by an indigenous worldview in providing understanding and pathways to restore, engage, and extend natural energies in building campus ecologies that support bring a balanced to our institutional communities and practices. 

    Learning Outcomes:

    Participants will:

    • acquire a better understanding of the journey first-generation Indigenous students take as they transition to a college environment;
    • gain an overview of current considerations TCU professionals balance in developing ecologies that support student success; and 
    • consider the implications for designing programs that support the self-determination and autonomy of first-generation Indigenous students.
  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    In this live briefing, scholars will highlight recent research exploring how institutional mission statements can inform institutional practices dedicated to first-generation student success. Then, practitioners from First-gen Forward Institutions will share how their institutions have adopted mission-driven approaches to support first-gen initiatives.

    As institutions of higher education continue to seek ways to engage first-generation students, mission statements can inform campus-wide approaches to first-generation student success. In this session, we will review recent research that examines how the mission statements of First-gen Forward Institutions may signal or promote a success-oriented culture. Then, practitioners from the First-gen Forward recognition program will share how they have taken a mission-centric approach to first-generation student initiatives on their campuses. The presenters will offer practical strategies for leveraging mission to advance an institutional commitment to first-generation student success.

    Learning Outcomes:

    Participants will:

    • consider how components of mission statements can be leveraged for first-generation student success;
    • understand how First-gen Forward Institutions have designed and implemented mission-driven initiatives to foster first-generation student success; and
    • reflect on the alignment between their own institution’s mission and goals for supporting first-generation students
  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    This panel session will bring together a variety of perspectives to discuss the latest fact sheets from the Center for First-generation Student Success and the Crimsonbridge Foundation on the career and engagement outcomes of first-generation college graduates.

    This panel session will bring together a variety of perspectives to discuss the latest fact sheets from the Center for First-generation Student Success and the Crimsonbridge Foundation on the career and engagement outcomes of first-generation college graduates. By tying together a philanthropic, institutional development, and practitioner perspective, this session will feature a dynamic discussion as the panelists discuss improving first-generation student outcomes utilizing external and internal resources.

  • Contains 5 Component(s)

    This presentation shares case studies from two universities where libraries and archives have undertaken initiatives to document first-generation student narratives through the creation of oral histories. The presenters will discuss how these types of projects can contribute to first-generation student success and how administrators and others in higher education can support similar programs at their own institutions.

    First-generation college students have a profound impact both inside and outside the classroom on the strategic goals of universities, yet in-depth, firsthand information about their experiences is difficult for researchers and university administrators to find. Academic librarians and archivists can contribute to correcting this imbalance by capturing and preserving the lived stories of this largely under-recognized group. This presentation shares case studies from two universities where libraries and archives have undertaken initiatives to document first-generation student narratives through the creation of oral histories. The presenters will discuss how these types of projects can contribute to first-generation student success and how administrators and others in higher education can support similar programs at their own institutions.

    Learning Outcomes:

    Participants will:

    • learn multiple approaches to capturing first-generation student voices and shared experiences; and 
    • understand how to partner with university archives to connect with first-generation students.

  • Contains 7 Component(s)

    This session will highlight practical strategies to engage faculty and staff in enhancing the sense of belonging and overall success of first-generation students. This includes the creation of a collaborative, cross-division, on-campus student success summit designed to educate the campus community on the current state and trends of our first-generation student population as well as intentional, year-round outreach to faculty and staff.

    Learn about a cross-divisional collaboration to coordinate an on-campus first-generation student success summit to enhance the sense of belonging and overall success of this diverse and growing population at the University of San Diego (USD). The First-Generation Action Team’s (FGAT) original purpose was to engage and support the First-Generation undergraduate and graduate student experiences proactively to attain retention and graduation rates equal to, or greater than, the University’s average through a multi-layered holistic plan. 

    After two years of offering year-round programs, the First-Generation Action Team decided to coordinate a First-Generation Student Success Summit for the USD campus community titled “Enhancing a Sense of Belonging for USD’s First-Generation Students: Practical Strategies for Faculty and Staff.” Building off of the success of the first summit, the FGAT designed a second summit titled “Practical Strategies to Cultivate USD First-Generation Student Success.” These summits are scaffolded to include quantitative data and analysis of USD’s First-Generation enrollment patterns and key demographics of the various intersecting identities followed by findings from qualitative research to inform the understanding of the first-generation student experiences on our campus. The Student Success Summits have become an annual occurrence, evolving into conferences just for first-generation students.

    Beyond hosting a summit, participants will learn additional ways to reach out to faculty with readily implementable ideas and resources to support first-generation students’ success and sense of academic belonging. Lisa Nunn will offer some tips from her 2020 award winning book 33 Simple Strategies for Faculty, a Week-by-Week Resource for Teaching First-Year and First-Generation Students. Drawing from her 2021 book College Belonging: How First-Year and First-Generation Students Navigate Campus Life, she will also share ideas on ways alert faculty pay attention to the first-generation students in their classes as well as understand how to recognize both the strengths first-generation students bring with them as well as some common challenges they face.

    Learning Outcomes:

    Participants will:

    • identify key details in developing a collaborative student success summit centered on supporting the first-generation college student population; and 
    • list ways to reach out to faculty with readily implementable resources to support first-generation students’ academic success and to foster academic belonging.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    The presenter will address the challenge of assessing concerning online communication, written narratives, and artistic works. The program is divided into three sections: 1) a discussion of the growing use of social media and a review of foundational elements of threat assessment; 2) a review of the assessment and intervention processes when a concern is identified; and 3) a discussion of contagion effect and postvention. Several case examples will be used to help the group identify and practice.

    The presenter will address the challenge of assessing concerning online communication, written narratives, and artistic works. The program is divided into three sections: 1) a discussion of the growing use of social media and a review of foundational elements of threat assessment; 2) a review of the assessment and intervention processes when a concern is identified; and 3) a discussion of contagion effect and postvention. Several case examples will be used to help the group identify and practice.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    More than 50% - that’s the proportion of students that a 2016 survey found ignore emails from their academic department or institution. In this learning session, we’ll explore how the increasingly competitive market for digital experiences is demanding institutional communicators stand out to capture student attention. Explore the channels having the most impact on student success, including virtual communities and push notifications, and why any strategy for driving engagement needs to start with mobile.

    More than 50% - that’s the proportion of students that a 2016 survey found ignore emails from their academic department or institution. If your email communication efforts may only be reaching half of your students, how can you impact student success and retention? With key student support efforts, from financial aid, to academic support, to student engagement, often funneled through one of several email inboxes that any student might have, missing a single message could mean missing an opportunity that might be critical to keeping them on the path to graduation. On top of this, email doesn’t even rank as one of the top 5 five apps that most students regularly use on their devices.

    In this learning session, we’ll explore how the increasingly competitive market for digital experiences is demanding institutional communicators stand out to capture student attention. Explore the channels having the most impact on student success, including virtual communities and push notifications, and why any strategy for driving engagement needs to start with mobile.

  • Contains 3 Component(s)

    This panel presentation explores the concept of Intersectionality from multiple lenses, and how race, class, gender, ethnicity and sexual orientation identities intersect and affect First-Generation College Student identities.

    This panel presentation explores the concept of Intersectionality from multiple lenses, and how race, class, gender, ethnicity and sexual orientation identities intersect and affect First-Generation College Student identities. The panelists contributed chapters to the edited volume, “At the Intersection: Understanding and Supporting First-Generation College Students” and will offer strategies that faculty and staff can better use to support this population will also be discussed.

  • Contains 11 Component(s)

    This self-paced course is designed to be an introduction to the various roles and competencies of an effective peer education advisor. The content for this course was developed by campus peer education advisors who serve as volunteer faculty with NASPA.

    Welcome to the Peer Education Advisors Academy!

    This self-paced course is designed to be an introduction to the various roles and competencies of an effective peer education advisor. The content for this course was developed by campus peer education advisors just like you who serve as volunteer faculty with NASPA. 

    In the Handouts section of this course, you will find a PDF workbook designed as an accompaniment to this training. Please use this workbook to take notes, engage in reflection, and think of ways you can apply the course content to your work with students. 

    If you have any questions, please email bacchusadmin@naspa.org and a member of our team will be happy to assist you! 

    Acknowledgements

    The Peer Education Advisors Academy would not exist without the hard work and dedication of our volunteer faculty. Special thanks go to the below individuals who have worked on various iterations of this program. 

    • Alicia Czachowski, Tulane University
    • Karen Flanagan, Sacred Heart University
    • Leslie Haxby McNeill, Miami University
    • La’ Tesha Hinton, Tulane University
    • Aaron Maracle, University at Buffalo SUNY
    • Michael McNeil, Columbia University
    • Joleen Nevers, University of Connecticut
    • Mandy Parente, University of Alabama at Birmingham
    • Ryan Travia, Babson College

  • Contains 5 Product(s)

    Technology skills in student affairs are no longer an optional area of professional development. Our resources aim to assist in advancing your expertise regardless of your starting point. This bundled starter pack gives you a great selection of presentations centering on bringing technology into student affairs practice.

    Included Presentations:

    • #CatPulse: Texts and Mini Surveys Keep the Pulse of Student Life at The University of Arizona
    • Implementing Customized Online Orientation
    • When No One Knows Who You Are: Anonymity, Apps, and Accountability
    • Making Your Media Accessible
    • Make Your Users Happy: How to Improve the User Experience of Your Website