2024 Virtual Conference Schedule

April 2, 2024

Click below to learn more about the session and speakers. For registration information, visit the Registration website. Session links will be available ten minutes before session begins. 

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Tue, Apr 2 at 1:30 pm EDT
The Inspire Model: A Modern Approach to Career Success

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Speakers

Cameron Vakilian, Director of Experiential Learning

Overview

It's time to start thinking outside the box when it comes to career success in today's world. To help students design their career, the presenter will introduce a new model, featured on the - Inspiring Internships Podcast, and highlight four stages: Inquire, Acquire, Aspire, and Inspire, with engaging activities, discussions, and success stories. The Inspire Model has led the College of Humanities at the University of Utah to improve career success outcomes significantly and has more than doubled internship participation over the past year.
Learning Outcomes:

After this session, participants will be able to: 

  1. Articulate the evolving landscape of career success in the current job market.
  2. Understand the innovative four-stage model (Inquire, Acquire, Aspire, and Inspire) for achieving career goals.
  3. Facilitate critical thinking and practical application of career development strategies.

Tue, Apr 2 at 1:30 pm EDT
Conversations About Alcohol and Sex - Changes in Community Norms and Culture

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Speakers

Haleigh Harrold, Executive Director

Overview

We know that to be successful and empower communities to be leaders in prevention, we must address implicit bias and create intersectional programs. This includes having nuanced conversations about identity, alcohol, and sex. Furthermore, in social settings, safety is not only a concern for people drinking but for everyone. During this workshop, we will discuss social norms around alcohol, identify ways to build community through intentional dialogue, and provide tips for including intersectional practices in sexual violence prevention.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will be able to explain how implicit bias impacts prevention facilitation, and strategies.
  2. Through a deep dive into conversations about alcohol and sex, participants will be able to describe how primary prevention includes changes in community norms and culture to support people in preventing sexual violence.
  3. Participants will strategize how to build relationships in their community to engage underserved populations in violence prevention work.

Tue, Apr 2 at 2:30 pm EDT
Rage Against the Machine: Ethical Usage of AI in Advising Curricula to Enhance the Student Experience

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Speakers

Alexandra Karlesses, Assistant Director of Career Development

Overview

According to a 2023 NACE poll, more than 40% of career services professionals reported using artificial intelligence for work tasks over the last year, but fewer than half reported using it with students. The presenters will educate how advising professionals can implement AI into their discussions with students. In the wake of this new technology, There is now an opportunity to responsibly leverage its benefits in order to educate ourselves on its possibilities, and to advise students in a more impactful and profound way.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will be able to understand the impact of AI in higher education and its larger implications through moderated discussion.
  2. Participants will feel empowered to discuss the ethics of AI, appropriate usage, and be able to facilitate these discussions with their students.
  3. Participants will be able to understand and add to the opportunities for innovation that AI can provide in student career education through interactive discussion and pair-and-share activities.

Tue, Apr 2 at 2:30 pm EDT
Strategies for Addressing Antisemitism and Supporting Jewish Life on Campus

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Speakers

Jessica L Nare, Assistant Vice President

Overview

Over the past several years, the Jewish community has been the target of multiple violent attacks, including those in Pittsburgh, Jersey City, and in San Diego County. San Diego State University also experienced several antisemitic incidents both on campus and in the college area. This presenter will share information about the creation of a Presidential Task Force to Address Antisemitism and the Task Force’s significant policy and climate accomplishments to support Jewish life on campus.
Learning Outcomes:
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of some of the basic challenges facing Jewish students within institutions of higher learning
  2. Articulate a basic definition of antisemitism (as crafted by the Presidential Task Force)
  3. Identify three strategies from the presentation to support Jewish students that can be implemented on participants' respective campuses

Tue, Apr 2 at 2:30 pm EDT
Taking a Systems-Wide Approach to Early Alerts at BGSU

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Speakers

Kimberlyn Brooks, Taking a Systems-Wide Approach to Early Alerts at BGSU

Sarah Jurden, Director of Student Success Strategies and Initiatives

Glenn Davis, Vice President for Student Engagement and Success

Overview

The presenters will share how Bowling Green State University has transitioned from a passive early alert process to an intrusive system that leverages structural relationships between students and staff members, many of whom are NOT academic advisors. Staff members serving as Outreach Coordinators connect with students via texts, phone calls, and in-person chats to learn root causes of alerts and connect students with campus resources. Since its launch in 2021, BGSU’s early alert system has improved student retention in the target group by 5%.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will learn how BGSU reached across divisions and offices to promote a systems-wide response to early alerts.
  2. Participants will understand the whole early alert cycle at BGSU and the role each of our constituents plays in making the process successful and efficient.
  3. Participants will be able to evaluate the strengths and challenges of implementing a similar program at their college/university.

Tue, Apr 2 at 2:30 pm EDT
Reimagining Student Involvement in a Post-Pandemic Environment: Navigating Access, Motivating Participation, and Building Community

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Overview

Today, institutions are faced with a complex challenge: the need to revitalize student engagement in a landscape marked by growing financial concerns, shifts in campus culture, traditions, and a need to reassess what motivates student involvement. Together, we'll delve into new student engagement trends, balancing access and motivation, fostering racial justice, and prioritizing student mental health, which is central to our exploration of how campus professionals can reengage students in a post-pandemic environment.

Following this session, participants will be able to recognize the significance of addressing racial justice, pandemics, and student mental health in establishing a culture of engagement.

Tue, Apr 2 at 3:30 pm EDT
Amplifying Voices: Students Role in Advocating for Health Equity

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Speakers

Alexis Washington, Assistant Director, Health Promotion

Overview

Achieving health equity at a college campus requires a collective effort, and students' voices should be heard during this movement. This presentation will discuss the formation of a student organization, "Student Advocates for Well-being". In this session, presenters will explore how this group of students raised awareness, held focus groups, and are writing a White Paper to address these student concerns. Students have unique perspectives, energy, and potential for creating meaningful change on campus, therefore their voices should be heard.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will be able to recognize the role of students in advocating for health equity on campus.
  2. Participants will be able to describe the steps it takes to create a student-led initiative on their campus to advocate for change.


Tue, Apr 2 at 3:30 pm EDT
How to collect student demographic data inclusively and effectively: With an example of the National Assessment of Collegiate Campus Climates

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Speakers

Jihye Kwon, Associate Director for Survey Research, Adjunct Assistant Professor

Rodolfo Núñez, Senior Research Analyst

Overview

The presenters will share examples of inclusive student survey design and considerations of the survey team from the National Assessment of Collegiate Campus Climates from the Race and Equity Center at the University of Southern California, which has been developed based on more than a decade of research and numerous case studies on race and equity issues in U.S. higher Education. Attendees will also learn useful functions and tips on Qualtrics, which foster the efficiency of surveys and increase the response rate of surveys.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will be able to articulate the importance and the role of diversity, equity, and inclusion in survey design.
  2. Participants will learn how to create inclusive demographic questions for student experience, awareness, or satisfaction surveys.
  3. Participants will learn useful functions and tools in Qualtrics, which allow student affairs professionals and leaders to create and revise an effective student survey.

Tue, Apr 2 at 3:30 pm EDT
Integrating Student and Academic Affairs: Providing Students with a First-Class Learning Experience

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Speakers

Bill Stackman, Dean of Students

Overview

Student affairs cannot afford to operate as an island. To fully support student success, leaders within the division of student affairs must develop solid partnerships with academic affairs. The presenters will highlight student success efforts resulting from strategic collaborations by the vice provost for undergraduate studies and the vice chancellor for student affairs and their respective teams at the University of Missouri. They will discuss a collection of helpful strategies to build effective collaborations gathered from other campuses.
Learning Outcomes:
  1. Participants will be able to describe high impact cross-division strategies for student success and early detection strategies to support retention, sense of belonging, inclusion, and equity.
  2. Participants will be able to explain the value of effective student and academic affairs collaborations for student learning and success.
  3. Participants will be able to describe cultural and structural strategies for collaborative efforts and opportunities between student affairs and academic affairs.

Tue, Apr 2 at 3:30 pm EDT
A Labor of Love: How Two Colleagues Co-Edited a Book

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Speakers

Jeannette Smith, VPSA

Overview

Join us for a brief lecture where we will share how we established a working relationship, the ups and downs of finding an editor, what happened when the story took on a life of its own, and the joy of connecting and collaborating with co-authors across the country. We’ll have time for your questions and a share out opportunity for the audience to brainstorm their ideas for future work that will add to the knowledge base of student affairs and inform our practice.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will leave with an understanding of one route to publishing. 
  2. Participants will leave understanding the rudimentary elements of a co-edited, multi-co-author text. 
  3. Participants will leave with two resources they can call upon for support.


April 3, 2024

Click below to learn more about the session and speakers. For registration information, visit the Registration website. Session links will be available ten minutes before session begins. 

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Wed, Apr 3 at 1:30 am EDT
Faculty and Student Affairs Come Together to Create Meaningful High Impact Practices as Part of the Central Washington University Student Experience

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Speakers

Joy Fuqua, Executive Director of Interactive Instruction and Innovative Delivery

Overview

High-impact practices (HIPs) bring higher levels of learning success but require an intentional, developmentally based, and equity-focused structure. Presenters will use a fireside chat format to encourage audience interaction and facilitate conversation about how campus staff, faculty, and administrators collaborate on innovative, effective high-impact practices to enhance student experiences and help students build skills for an ever-changing world.
Learning Outcomes:
  1. Articulation on how collaboration can assist in expanding HIPs beyond the institution using partnerships, faculty, career services, interdisciplinary course, and activity design.
  2. Determine ways in which learning experiences can translate into student success and workforce readiness.
  3. Frame critical data points for student experiences and high-impact practices for university continuous assessment and improvement.

Wed, Apr 3 at 1:30 pm EDT
Listening for the Quiet Voices: Developing Inclusive Spaces for Introverted Students and Colleagues - General Interest Session

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Speakers

Rayna Tagalicod, Director of National Student Exchange & Assistant Faculty Specialist

Overview

While extroverts are known as being outgoing, assertive, and often considered likable and good leaders, introverts are often known as quiet or anti-social. However, introverts are also active listeners, creative, and adept at relating to others. The presenter will share a deeper understanding of introversion using Jung’s personality theory, describe the types of introverts, explore misconceptions and strengths, and discuss strategies to support and empower introverted students and colleagues.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Understand introversion, including recognizing common misconceptions and strengths.
  2. Identify strategies to best support, collaborate with, and empower introverted students and colleagues.

Wed, Apr 3 at 1:30 pm EDT
Student Conduct Approaches & Models for Student Organization Accountability

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Speakers

Pietro Sasso, Associate Professor

Overview

The presenters will share findings from a national qualitative study exploring the use of student organization accountability models and frameworks by student conduct administrators. Findings will be shared about how incidents are investigated, methods of accountability, and the functionality of addressing collective members/organizational behavior. Implications for practice will be included by comparing findings to existing conduct from professional associations including AFA, NASPA, and ASCA.
Learning Outcomes:
  1. Participants will be able to identify current student organization accountability models in comparison to study findings
  2. Participants will be able to distinguish areas of opportunity to improve their model student organization code of conduct
  3. Participants will be able to differentiate between individual and organization concepts within an institutional code of conduct

Wed, Apr 3 at 1:30 pm EDT
Understanding the Dynamics of the AVP/Senior Officer Relationship for Aspiring Assistant/Associate Vice Presidents, Deans, and Number 2s

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Speakers

Brett Bruner, Assistant Vice President for Student Success & Persistence

Melissa Mace, Vice President for Enrollment Management

Overview

Assistant/associate vice presidents and deans of students have a unique lens to positively influence student success, persistence, and belonging on their respective campuses. With one foot in strategic spaces and another working directly with students and staff, AVPs and deans can best leverage their roles to transform student experiences. They can only do so when they work in tandem with their senior student affairs officer. The presenters will share how aspiring AVPs/deans must understand this dynamic if they are to succeed in their roles.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. As a result of attending this session, participants will identify at least three competencies of assistant/associate vice presidents for student affairs.
  2. As a result of attending this session, participants will describe the needed relationship between assistant/associate vice presidents, deans, and numbers 2s and their senior student affairs officers if both are to be successful in their roles.
  3. As a result of attending this session, participants will identify at least 1 strategy to cultivate and/or steward a positive working relationship with their senior student affairs officer.

Wed, Apr 3 at 2:30 pm EDT
Leading through Change in Connecting Living-learning Communities to Institutional Student Success & Persistence Priorities

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Speakers

Brett Bruner, Assistant Vice President for Student Success & Persistence

John Vanderpool, Director of Housing & Residence Life

Overview

Institutions have long embraced living-learning community programs for their positive outcomes such as the value-added social and psychological benefits that sudents receive from participating in them. As institutional fiscal and human resources are stretched now more than ever before, leaders must connect these experiences to institutional student success and persistence priorities. Presenters will share how they have employed leadership styles that incorporated change management to connect their living-learning communities to student success.
Learning Outcomes:
  1. As a result of attending this session, participants will identify at least 2 student success and/or persistence benefits for students participating in them.
  2. As a result of attending this session, participants will describe at least 2 steps of Kotter's (2012) 8-step change model.
  3. As a result of attending this session, participants will describe at least 2 strategies for how they can employ Kotter's (2012) 8-step change model in leading change to connect living-learning communities to institutional student success priorities.

Wed, Apr 3 at 2:30 pm EDT
Leveraging Mentorship for Career Development of Black Women

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Speakers

Evette Allen Moore, Assistant Dean, Diversity, Equity, Inclusion

Overview

Mentoring has been noted as one strategy to assist Black women with coping with struggles within higher education, as well as a strategy to assist with navigating higher education institutions. The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of how Black women can best use mentors to develop as professionals and to scale their careers. Additionally, for those who mentor Black women, research-based advice is offered to help mentors be intentional about the success of Black women.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. To better understand concerns of Black women in academia though a social justice lens. 
  2. To learn how to apply concepts and models that support Black women in higher education


Wed, Apr 3 at 2:30 pm EDT
Elevating Student Voices using AI: The New Era of Student Success

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Speakers

Elaine T. White, AVP/Dean of Students

Overview

Presenters will share their experiences using AI to deepen engagement with students and elevate their voices. Through the use of AI, the student voice can be incorporated into decision-making and drive proactive attentiveness. The presenters will provide highlights from Vaughn College, where students have 24/7/365 support and administrators have real-time data about the students they serve. This interactive presentation is designed to share a combined "high tech" and "high touch" approach to student success.
Learning Outcomes:

After this session, participants will be able to: 

  1. Develop student feedback and non-academic metrics to use as retention strategies.
  2. Translating theoretical persistence models into tangible actions.
  3. Identify technology that is key in orchestrating timely individualized outreach.

Wed, Apr 3 at 3:30 pm EDT
Student Caregivers & Building Care-aware Culture on Your Campus

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Speakers

Elaine Jessica Tamargo, Ph.D. Candidate

Overview

AARP estimates that 38 million, or 11.5% of the US population, are unpaid family caregivers, and in 2020, they estimated that 5 million students in higher education are caring for adults. Caregiving affects their educational and professional trajectories, and many report burning out. The presenters, current and former caregivers, will identify areas to better understand this population and will offer ideas for institutions to enhance their campus culture to be both caregiving-aware and take care of their students, staff, and faculty caregivers.

Learning Outcomes:

  1. By the end of this program, participants will be able to identify the characteristics of student caregivers and the different scopes and types of caregiving responsibilities they may have
  2. Participants will be able to recognize how the internal and external pressures of caregiving impact students'™higher education experiences and outcomes.
  3. Participants will be able to Evaluate the pros and cons of different emerging best practices from other campuses and develop and appraise ideas with fellow participants to bring back to their own campuses to support student caregivers.

Wed, Apr 3 at 3:30 pm EDT
Promising Policies and Practices for Supporting Trans and Nonbinary Students

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Speakers

Debbie Bazarksy, Director of the LGBTQIA+ Center for Faculty & Staff

Overview

Student affairs practitioners must have clear guidance to meet the needs of trans and nonbinary students and provide them with support in today’s hostile political climate. Participants in this session will learn about the updated and expanded Consortium of Higher Education LGBT Resource Professionals’ - Promising Policies and Practices for Supporting Trans and Nonbinary Students. Attendees will be provided with concrete actions ranging from day-to-day practices to departmental and institutional policies to enact campus-wide change.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Learn about the development of promising policies and practices for supporting trans and nonbinary students
  2. Gain an understanding of the types of organizational policies and practices (i.e., specific to a multitude of campus areas) that can expand inclusion, equity, and belonging
  3. Receive guidance about concrete actions participants can take to implement these new policies and practices on their campuses

Wed, Apr 3 at 3:30 pm EDT
Appreciative Mentoring: Supporting New Student Affairs Professionals in a World in Flux

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Overview

Mentoring has long been viewed as an important avenue for supporting new professionals in student affairs. As higher education institutions experience significant challenges with recruitment and retention in student-facing positions, support for professional development is even more pressing. Appreciative Mentoring (AM) is a staff mentoring model, built on the Appreciative Inquiry framework. Presenters will provide tools for impementing AM with early career student affairs professionals.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will be able to understand and recall basic principles of appreciative inquiry
  2. Participants will be able to apply principles of appreciative inquiry to mentoring new professionals


Wed, Apr 3 at 3:30 pm EDT
Friends With Weed, Friends Indeed: College Students Negotiating Marijuana Legalization

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Speakers

Pietro Sasso, Associate Professor

Overview

The presenters will share findings from a national qualitative study that explored the experiences of college students following the recreational marijuana legalization. Findings suggested a general lack of knowledge regarding cannabis consumption and legalization. However, there is a desire to practice safe consumption and receive a more meaningful education on the topic. Recommendations for practice will be provided for higher education institutions to increase efforts to educate on safe practices and challenge stigma and misperceptions.
Learning Outcomes:
  1. Participants will be able to better understand student perceptions about the legal use of marijuana use
  2. Participants will be able to identify the campus legal contexts about legal use of marijuana
  3. Participants will be able to distinguish marijuana legalization and use between off-campus and on-campus contexts

April 4, 2024

Click below to learn more about the session and speakers. For registration information, visit the Registration website. Session links will be available ten minutes before session begins. 

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Thu, Apr 4 at 1:30 pm EDT
Transforming Virtual Engagement to Increase Student Involvement on College Campuses

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Speakers

Lauren Cox, Virtual Engagement Project Coordinator

University, San Francisco California / Student Life

Overview

The pandemic changed the way universities navigate student engagement. As a new generation of students starts their college experience, learn from a university that shifted traditional resources to create an inaugural position dedicated to virtual engagement and how it changed the landscape of student involvement with staff and support services. This strategy, grounded in diversity, equity, and inclusion, elevated reciprocal campus partnerships that made data-informed decisions for student success.

Learning Outcomes:

Participants who attend this session will be able to: 

  1. Develop virtual engagement strategies focused on student services and experience while using a DEI framework. 
  2. Identify best practices for creating student-focused content. 
  3. Design assessments that measure student success.

Thu, Apr 4 at 1:30 pm EDT
Engagement by Design: Strategies for building a successful co-curricular model

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Speakers

Rayshawn Eastman, Associate Vice President for Student Engagement

Wilmington College

Overview

Co-curricular activities play a crucial role in students' overall development and success, providing opportunities to enhance their skills, knowledge, and experiences outside of the traditional academic curriculum. The presenters will discuss the importance of student engagement in co-curricular programming and its role in supporting student success. Presenters will delve into proven strategies and practices for designing and implementing a successful co-curricular program based on existing programs created by the presenters.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will understand key theoretical foundations such as Astin's developmental theory of student involvement and Kuh et al.'s factors contributing to student success in college.
  2. Participants will design and implement a successful institution-wide co-curricular model.


Thu, Apr 4 at 1:30 pm EDT
6 Tools for Training and Development Success Stories - General Interest Session

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Speakers

Helen Mulhern Halasz, 6 Tools for Training and Development Success Stories

East Carolina University

Brian Regan, Associate Director of Residential Education

Boston College

Overview

From onboarding new employees to upskilling an experienced team for internal mobility, learner-centered training and development are key to performance management and organizational success. Corporate talent development strategies can be used to engage student affairs educators in a process that opens space to meet, adapt, and sustain professional development needs at all organizational levels. Learn about six tools, concepts, and software to create and deliver powerful face-to-face and on-demand professional development stories.

Learning Outcomes:

Participants in this session will be able to: 

  1. Identify knowledge, skills, and dispositions related to talent development focused on Student Affairs (SA) Professional Competency areas.
  2. Recognize components of 6 talent development concepts and tools for learner-centered training and development.
  3. Connect features of talent development concepts and tools most relevant to their campus professional development context.

Thu, Apr 4 at 1:30 pm EDT
Using cocurricular data to predict and enhance student success metrics

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Speakers

Jessica Oyler, Vice President for Student Access and Success

Weber State University

Dr. Heather J. Chapman, Senior Director for Data & Analytics

Weber State University

Overview

Predictive analytics models can be used to assist colleges and universities in meeting their strategic goals. Often, the focus of such models is on student academic and demographic data but some of the most impactful experiences are co-curricular. The presenters will focus on models that include the co-curricular aspects of the learning environment in predictive models and report on institutional changes enacted because of such models.
Learning Outcomes:
  1. Identify a variety of cocurricular practices that have a positive impact on student success metrics.
  2. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of using cocurricular data in predictive models.
  3. Discuss models that could be explored on their own campuses.

Thu, Apr 4 at 2:30 pm EDT
Wintersession: Contributing to Students Positive Mental Health Outside of the Counseling Office

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Speakers

Judy Jarvis, Executive Director, Office of Campus Engagement

Princeton University

Overview

Campus counseling resources are incredibly important, yet some college and university officials see therapy as the only route to addressing students’ mental health. In reality, there are other research-based approaches student affairs professionals can take to complement the work of their counseling colleagues. The presenters will share details of a successful Wintersession initiative that has positively contributed to students’ mental health, with lessons learned for student affairs professionals to apply at their respective institutions.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Attendees will be able to develop a successful conference/festival model that has been shown to contribute positively to students' Mental health.
  2. Attendees will be able to indentify best practices to apply learnings on their own campuses.


Thu, Apr 4 at 2:30 pm EDT
It Takes A Village To Change The World: Understanding and Expanding the Concept of Relationship while in a doctoral program (Part 1)

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Speakers

Melissa J Watson, Doctoral Graduate student

High Point University

Overview

In the realm of doctoral education, the saying, "It takes a village to raise a child" carries profound significance. This program delves into the concept of a "village" in the context of doctoral studies, highlighting the pivotal role of relationships, support networks, and collaborative endeavors in fostering the growth and triumph of doctoral candidates. The presenters will guide a panel presentation by doctoral candidates pursuing the Doctor of Education in Educational Leadership (Ed.D.) program at High Point University.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will grasp the significance of an academic "village" in the context of doctoral programs and recognize how relationships within this village are crucial for academic and personal development.
  2. Participants will identify and appreciate the roles of various stakeholders within a doctoral program, including advisors, mentors, peers, and support staff, and understand how their collective contributions shape a candidate's experience.
  3. Participants will understand how positive relationships with peers and faculty members foster a sense of belonging within the academic community, enhancing motivation and engagement throughout the doctoral journey.

Thu, Apr 4 at 3:30 pm EDT
Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Accessibility: Enhancing Support for Students with Disabilities

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Speakers

Michael Butcher, Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs/Dean of Students and Title IX Coordinator

College of Coastal Georgia

Overview

The presenter will share groundbreaking approaches to using Artificial Intelligence (AI) for enhancing accessibility and support for students with disabilities. Attendees will explore AI-driven tools to help with personalized learning, engagement, and communication. Ethical considerations, along with strategies for implementation, will also be discussed. The session will emphasize the need for a participatory approach, involving students with disabilities in the co-design of AI-enabled educational tools to ensure inclusivity and effectiveness.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. By the end of the session, attendees will be able to identify at least three AI-driven tools that can enhance accessibility and learning for students with disabilities, along with their potential ethical implications.
  2. Attendees will gain the skills to implement a participatory approach in their educational settings, enabling them to involve students with disabilities in the co-design of AI-enabled educational tools for improved inclusivity and effectiveness.

Thu, Apr 4 at 3:30 pm EDT
WINS: Promoting the Social and Academic Advancement of BIPOC Womxn in the Sciences

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Speakers

Candace Sumner-Robinson, Director, Undergraduate Academic Advising - CCAS

George Washington University

Christopher Holiman, Esq., Assistant Dean, Intercultural Advising and Engagement

New York University

Overview

Today, institutions are faced with a complex challenge: the need to revitalize student engagement in a landscape marked by growing financial concerns, shifts in campus culture and traditions, and a need to reassess what motivates student involvement. Together, we'll delve into new student engagement trends, balancing access and motivation, fostering racial justice, and prioritizing student mental health, which is central to our exploration of how campus professionals can reengage students in a post-pandemic environment.

Following this session, participants will be able to:

1. Recognize the significance of addressing racial justice, pandemics, and student mental health in establishing a culture of engagement.

2. Understand student engagement trends that foster racial justice. 

Thu, Apr 4 at 3:30 pm EDT
What is Missing in Persistence Models? Integrating Basic Needs and Belongingness

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Speakers

Gavin Henning, Professor of Higher Education

New England College

Anne Lundquist, Executive Director at the Hope Center at

Temple University

Overview

Retention models share common elements such as student characteristics, institutional experiences, and academic and social integration. However, few specifically - basic needs (e.g., food, housing, transportation) and - belonging as essential components of student success. Presenters will provide an overview and discuss the impact of basic needs and belonging to persistence, share a theoretical framework for including them within persistence models, and provide recommendations for addressing these issues in student affairs practice.
Learning Outcomes:

Participants who attend this session will be able to: 

  1. Describe the impact that basic needs and belonging have on college student persistence.
  2. Identify strategies to address basic needs and belonging in student affairs practice.


Thu, Apr 4 at 3:30 pm EDT
How Do You Feel About EQ and You? : Teaching Emotional Intelligence as a Leadership Tool

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Speakers

Jason Joyce, Associate Director, Changemaker Center

NYU

Overview

Across professional settings, emotional-social skills are four times more important than the Intelligence quotient (IQ). The presenter will invite audience members to learn about the concept of emotional intelligence (EQ) and why it matters, how to build and foster high-functioning, collaborative teams by empowering individuals to practice advanced EQ and communication strategies, and will provide structured opportunities for participants to explore and upskill their own EQ through active participation in teambuilder activities.

Learning Outcomes:

Participants who attend this session will be able to: 

  1. Identify why emotional intelligence is important for professionals.
  2. Describe how emotional intelligence team builders look and feel within their current roles. 
  3. Develop continued effective practice that improves emotional intelligence skills. 

April 5, 2024

Click below to learn more about the session and speakers. For registration information, visit the Registration website. Session links will be available ten minutes before session begins. 

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Fri, Apr 5 at 1:30 pm EDT
What Is Our Role Within DEI? Developing Inclusive Career Development Programming and Resources For Students

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Speakers

Catherine Okafor, Assistant Director, Career Development & Employer Relations

UNC Chapel Hill, Kenan-Flagler Business School

Overview

Given the growing, diverse student population at institutions across the country, many institutions have developed diversity-related initiatives. Even though the work may begin at the senior leadership level, how can university career centers contribute to the institution's DEI goal? In this session, the presenter will 1) discuss how career development professionals can incorporate DEI within programs, coaching, and resources and 2) share best sustainable practices used at UNC-Chapel Hill, Kenan-Flagler Business School's Career Center.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will be able to develop a better understanding of the role that career professionals can play in meeting the needs of a diverse student population through a social justice lens.
  2. Participants will be able to develop career development programming and resources to increase student engagement with career centers.
  3. Participants will be able to identify key partners on campus to support their programs, coaching, and resources to best support underrepresented students. 

Fri, Apr 5 at 1:30 pm EDT
From Student Worker to Full Time Professional: Crafting Impactful Student Positions - General Interest Session

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Speakers

Monique Taylor, Assistant Director, Outreach & Communications

University of Washington Bothell

Overview

Student employment is a key part of the college experience. Students have long relied on campus positions for basic needs assistance and work experience. However, the ongoing global pandemic has made student employment much more complicated. The presenter will discuss how the School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences at UW Bothell successfully developed an impactful student position amidst uncertainty. Through reflection and group discussion, the attendees will be invited to explore innovative approaches to student positions for a new world.
Learning Outcomes:
  1. Participants will develop an understanding of the relationship between college student employment and student success
  2. Participants will become familiar with current employment trends and projections nationwide
  3. Participants will leave with a framework for developing student positions that are responsive to the current environment

Fri, Apr 5 at 1:30 pm EDT
Veterans Helping Veterans: Strategies for Enhancing Student Veterans Sense of Belonging in Colleges and Universities

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Speakers

Tara Hornor, Professor and Coordinator of Higher Education Leadership Programs

The Citadel

Overview

The presenter will share research findings from a study examining student veterans’ sense of belonging within higher education institutions, the factors influencing their feelings of belonging, and strategies higher education institutions can utilize to enhance student veterans’ sense of belonging on campus. The presenter will share specific approaches for increasing student veterans’ sense of belonging, including institutional acknowledgment and inclusion techniques, veteran peer support, and faculty engagement strategies.
Learning Outcomes:

Participants will be able to: 

  1. Describe student veteran's sense of belonging in colleges and universities.
  2. Articulate the factors that influence student veteran's feelings of belonging.
  3. Implement specific tools and strategies colleges and universities can use to enhance student veterans' sense of belonging on campus.

Fri, Apr 5 at 2:30 pm EDT
Finch-Forward Coaching: Adapting Coaching Programs to Diverse Environments

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Speakers

Daniel Easton, Program Director Academic Coaching and Success Initiatives

University of Colorado Boulder

Karl Uzcategui, Associate Director, Student Diversity & Multicultural Affairs

Fairfield University

Overview

Success coaching is grounded in a robust research foundation, affirming its efficacy as an academic intervention that enhances student persistence and advancement and bolsters confidence. Its individualized nature means it can be adapted to many different academic environments while maintaining a core coaching framework. The presenters will show what makes coaching distinct from other related interventions, how and what makes it effective, and show two separate coaching models that serve distinct student communities.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will be able to articulate the factors that characterize academic coaching in contrast to other student services.
  2. Participants will be able to identify how coaching programs can be structured to meet the needs of different student and institutional types.
  3. Participants will apply their understanding of coaching programs through a case study focused on a single student and an institutional-level scenario.

Fri, Apr 5 at 2:30 pm EDT
Creating Care: How Designated Title IX 'Care Managers' Effectively and Empathetically Support Students

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Speakers

Jacob Boarnet, Intake, Outreach, and Care Manager

University of Southern California

Overview

This presentation delves into USC’s Office for Equity, Equal Opportunity, and Title IX’s innovative approach. Dedicated 'Care Managers' focus solely on supportive measures, ensuring student well-being. Through quantitative data and real-life examples, attendees gain profound insights into Care Managers' effective and empathetic support. Practical recommendations for implementing best practices are provided, ensuring comprehensive student support.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Recognize patterns, barriers, roadblocks, and successes in supporting students and apply strategies and recommendations to their processes for supporting their student population.
  2. Comprehend complexities in facilitating Title IX supportive measures and leave with tangible resources for identifying unique and tailored supportive measures that are supportive, reasonably available, and comply with current Title IX regulations.
  3. Understand how the unique approach to USC Title IX supportive measures has helped to most effectively support their students and increase students'™receptiveness to care through complex Title IX situations.


Co-Presenters include:

Tsasia Mercado (she/her)| Intake, Outreach, and Care Manager | University of Southern California
Eilish Kelderman (she/her) | Intake, Outreach, and Care Manager | University of Southern California
James Washington (he/him) | Intake, Outreach, and Care Manager | University of Southern California
Kegan Allee-Moawad (she/her) | Deputy Coordinator - Intake, Outreach, and Support | University of Southern California
Patti Aguirre (she/her) | Deputy Coordinator - Intake, Outreach, and Support | University of Southern California 

Fri, Apr 5 at 2:30 pm EDT
Including and Supporting Jewish Sorority and Fraternity Chapter Members

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Speakers

Pietro Sasso, Associate Professor

Penn State Piazza Center for Fraternity & Sorority Research and Reform

Overview

The presenters will share findings from a national study about how campus advisors include and support Jewish sorority and fraternity members. Situated in research on Jewish identity development and sense of belonging, the study examined advisors' understanding™ of inclusion and support and voices on their needs”  and students', particularly in this time of heightened antisemitism in the US. The presenters will share implications for practice about the need for a more nuanced understanding of Jewish students'™ identities and campus inclusion.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Participants will gain a working knowledge of Jewish fraternity and sorority members' own expressed needs for inclusion and belonging on campus.
  2. Participants will learn how fraternity and sorority life professionals currently see their roles in supporting Jewish chapter members and how these practices can be improved.
  3. Participants will be able to articulate how antisemitism and anti-Jewish bias impact students and professionals 

Fri, Apr 5 at 2:30 pm EDT
Integrated Strategic Planning in Student Affairs: Leveraging Data to Navigate Uncertainty

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Speakers

Tara Hornor, Professor and Coordinator of Higher Education Leadership Programs

The Citadel

Overview

Participants will learn about innovative strategies for linking assessment and strategic planning that engage the campus community in leveraging data during uncertain times and fostering additional opportunities for student success. The presenter will demonstrate how this process can be scaled up or down to fit specific unit or program-level initiatives.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. Describe a cyclical model of integrated strategic planning and assessment that can be leveraged to strengthen student affairs in times of uncertainty.
  2. Implement specific strategic planning tools and strategies student affairs leaders can use to engage campus stakeholders.

Fri, Apr 5 at 3:30 pm EDT
Leveraging Your Student Affairs & Academic Support Strengths to Build Community in Meaningful Ways Through First-Year Seminar Instruction

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Speakers

Brett Bruner, Assistant Vice President for Student Success & Persistence

Wichita State University

Overview

The first year seminar is a high-impact practice that can be used to deepen academic engagement, student connections, collaborative learning, and critical reflection and self-discovery. Student affairs, academic support, and student success professionals bring significant strengths that can be used to create a community within these courses in meaningful ways. Panelists in this session will explore how they have leveraged their strengths to build community as seminar instructors intentionally.
Learning Outcomes:

  1. As a result of attending this session, participants will describe how the first-year seminar impacts student success and persistence.
  2. As a result of attending this session, participants will identify at least one strength of their role in student affairs and academic support that can assist in intentionally building community in a first-year seminar course.
  3. As a result of attending this session, participants will describe their role in building community with other first-year seminar instructors on their campuses with an intentional focus on building community in FYS courses.


Co-Presenters:

1. Karen McCullough, Director of Career Services, Fort Hays State University

2. Megan Wyett Lennon, Associate Chief Student Affairs Officer, Amherst College

3.  Dana Tribble, Assistant Professor of Student Affairs Administration, Arkansas Tech University

4. Jennifer Granger Sullivan, Director of Experiential Learning/Co-Director of First Year Seminar, Elms College

5.  Ben Moran, Tutoring Coordinator, Missouri Western State University

Fri, Apr 5 at 3:30 pm EDT
Interventions and Strategies to Reduce Hazardous Drinking & Campus Hazing: A Panel of Experts

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Speakers

Pietro Sasso, Associate Professor

Penn State Piazza Center for Fraternity & Sorority Research and Reform

Overview

An interactive panel of hazardous drinking and hazing research experts will share their insights about the relationships between hazing and heavy episodic drinking among undergraduates in student organizations. Particular focus will be given to sororities and fraternities as well as broader campus undergraduate participation in binge drinking and hazing activities as these behaviors have rapidly shifted within the last biennium. Current trends, intervention strategies, as well as promising research will be elucidated by the expert panel.
Learning Outcomes:
  1. Participants will be able to identify trends in contemporary hazing and adjacent prevention research in the secondary education and college contexts.
  2. Participants will be able to draw connections between hazing and hazing adjacent research and prevention practices.
  3. Participants will be able to make connections between hazing and heavy episodic drinking as well as interconnected prevention efforts

Fri, Apr 5 at 3:30 pm EDT
Starting Well and Strong: Leveraging a Digital Well-being Tool to Support First-year Students

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Speakers

Briana Maturi, Director, Student Transitions & Success

Loyola Marymount University

Overview

TBD